Worktops DIY How To Projects

This page includes links to all of our Worktops DIY how to projects. Browse through the below list and click on your chosen link to view the project information.

Available DIY How To Projects

The choice of worktops is enormous, from relatively cheap worktops such as laminate, Formica, and some woods, to stone, marble and quartz, composite material like Corian and Maia, recycled glass, stainless steel and zinc and even bespoke concrete worktops cast in situ.

Worktop fillers can be used to fill scratches and blemishes on damaged worktops

Worktop fillers can be used to fill scratches and blemishes on damaged worktops

In this section we help you to chose the right worktop for your kitchen by explaining the properties and maintenance of each material. For instance we have a project on inserting a piece of granite into a Formica worktop to act as a pasty board and to give visual impact by breaking up a long fun of worktop, using different materials.

If you are going to have a hardwood worktop you should be sure it comes from a sustainable timber resource. We have projects n how to treat and maintain wooden worktops to ensure they stay in good condition, as the kitchen is an area of high humidity which could easily damage your worktop if it is not properly protected.

Glass and recycled glass worktops can look fabulous, recycled glass worktops are often only available as rectangular lengths and it may not be possible to cut them so they can’t be used for inserting hobs and sinks, but solid glass worktops can be cast with the desired hols in place.

Glass and recycled glass worktops can look fabulous, recycled glass worktops are often only available as rectangular lengths and it may not be possible to cut them so they can’t be used for inserting hobs and sinks, but solid glass worktops can be cast with the desired hols in place.

Composite worktops can be moulded so that the sink, and drainer are an integral part of the worktop. They can be chipped and burned so be careful not to drop anything heavy on them or to place very hot pans down on them.

Stone, granite and quartz worktops are all very hardwearing and easy to keep clean, the are also resistant to heat, although we would still recommend that you don’t put very hot pans down on any surface. You need to be careful about staining from certain foods such as red wine, tea and coffee (although granite is very resistant to staining).

Stainless steel worktops are virtually indestructible but they can look clinical in a domestic setting, if you like hard wearing and industrial you could go for concrete.

You are likely to want to inset taps, sinks and hobs into your worktop and so we offer information on cutting worktops, including to insert a sink, a gas hob and concealed sockets. We have guides to joining worktops and cutting mitres for corners, including how to use worktop mitre jigs (a jig is a guide or template to help you to get an accurate cut). Worktops are usually fitted over kitchen base units but you could also fit worktop legs to make a table, breakfast bar, or plain countertop surface with an open space underneath.