adding x400


Postby viv » Thu Jul 12, 2007 1:04 pm

Hi, I had a new combi fitted two years ago and shortly after that took out some breakdown cover with Worcester Bosch.
Following a brakdown, I called out the experts and was told that no inhibitor as been added and the new boiler is choked up with sludge.
I contacted the installer and he says the inhibitor as been added, but offered me the inhibitor and I can add it myself.
So my question is what is the easiest way ? do I drain one rad, get a small funnell and a length of tube and pour it in, avoiding spilling it on the carpet or is there an easier way.
The boiler is very easily accessable and I am hoping that there is a simple cover on the boiler that can just be lifted off and pour it in, or is that pure fantasy.
The boiler by the way is a Worcester Bosch Highflow 400.

Cheers and thanks for any help and advice, Andy
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Postby Perry525 » Fri Jul 13, 2007 8:06 am

If you look in your handbook, you will see that the boiler supplier/fitter is supposed to fit an "In-line scale inhibitor."
Current regulations also require that where a boiler is fitted in a hard water area the fitter is required to provide a means of lime scale free supply.
Have a word with your water supplier to check how hard the water is.
Look at the itemized bill you received from your supplier - was an inline inhibitor supplied? Did they charge you for a chemical scale inhibitor? Did they provide a means of lime scale free supply, if so where was it fitted?
If not, why not?
The first job is to flush out the system, get rid of all the loose scale, use a good flushing agent.
Then as modern systems hold very little water, consider filling with boiled water or buying in distilled water.
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Postby viv » Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:57 pm

Hi Perry525,

Many thanks, good sound advice, and most helpful. Cheers.
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Postby johnb » Fri Jul 13, 2007 2:09 pm

hi if your boiler has been diagnosed with sludge you have to clean the system using sludge remover then neutralizer and then when all is clear add inhibitor and not before, this takes a lot of time to do properly 4/6hrs is common best idea is to have the system jet flushed. as the amount of chemicals needed is not just one bottle of each type this will clean all pipework and radiators . i think it is unusual to have scale in your system as there is no access from fresh water the only scale that can enter from fresh water is via the heat exchanger for hot water this is completely separate from your boiler and sludge. to protect your hot water you can fit a scale inhibitor to the mains if you have a combi boiler if your boiler is not a combi then you do not need a scale inhibitor.use only fresh mains water to fill the system as the oxygen conntained in it is quickly lost and the ability to produce sludge is greatly reduced . all the best john
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Postby viv » Sat Jul 14, 2007 7:18 am

Hi, Johnb,
I have now added the sludge remover, and I suppose if I had been a plumber and had done the job before I would'nt have made it look so difficult and messy.
The question that keeps screaming out and gets louder by the minute is, if central heating systems through out the land are supposed to have this added and is no doubt beneficial to the boiler, heating system and the homeowner, why in this day and age are boiler manufactures not installing a filling point, ie close a couple of valves, unscrew a cap, pour it in, open a couple of valves and all over in less than five minutes, and the same can be said of radiators, why are they not brought into the twenty first century and fitted with a draining system, close off a valve at either end turn a tap underneath, job done.
A radiator is a massed produced product and as such a drain plug/sump plug facility done at its point of manufacture, the cost would be negligible.
Sorry about me getting on my soapbox, the plumber who installed the boiler is calling round in a week or so to power flush the system, so that should put a stop to me ringing Worcester Bosch every couple of days and even more important a big thanks to Johnb for hitting the nail on the head and bothering to reply.
Cheers.
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Postby johnb » Mon Jul 16, 2007 9:48 am

hi viv i think boiler manufacturing is a competitive business i have noticed over the years how they now put the least they can on new boilers. but combi boilers or sealed system boilers do have filling points .all the best john
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