Advice on Installing Separate Oven and Hob With Existing Cooker


Postby Trikie » Tue Apr 05, 2016 2:16 pm

Hi
I am after some advice please. I live in a flat that has a fuse box that has three fuses only. One for lights One for Sockets and one for Cooker. In the Kitchen there is the normal cooker wall socket with switch and 3 point plug socket and lower down is the plate for hard wiring the appliance. My wife recently purchased a separate electric oven and hob and I do not know the best way to install them. The Hob is an AEG HK95507FB it states it requires a electrical connection of 7.9kw and a fuse of 40 amps. The Oven is a Hotpoint DH53KS double electric oven and states it requires a electrical connection of 4.8kw and a fuse of 32 amps. If I have a fuse of 40/45 amps can I hard wire them both into the same socket or should I create a fused spur for the oven? or neither and need something else? Sorry for the long winded post but I wanted to provide as much info as possible. Also I believe the flat was built/renovated in 1980 in case that has some bearing on the wiring.
Thanks in advance for any advice given
Trikie
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Postby ericmark » Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:13 pm

You can get a double cooker connection unit which will allow both the devices to connect to the same point. It is unlikely that you can draw any more than 32A total without running new cable.

However every heater in a oven or cooker once to temperature switches on and off so although you could get an overload the time will be short so it will not over heat the cable. As long as the original 32A fuse/MCB is used should it draw more than allowed to prevent cable overheating the fuse/MCB will open and it will all fail safe. Assuming the oven is in the right housing and loss of fans will not mean it over heats.

My cooker is something like 11kW or 48A and is still on a 32A MCB which has never tripped. Seems odd I know but in essence the induction hob is more economic than any of the older types so although it has the ability to use more in real terms it uses less.

My induction hob works fine, had to rip my mothers out, not because of the hob its self but due to silly touch controls, we found she could not read the touch controls in a wheel chair, same problem for children, they are too short to read the display, so they can in error switch on the hob or change setting as nothing is visible at that angle. Ours has knobs so no problem, problem is they are never powered up in show room so one does not realise the problem with silly touch controls until too late. With the old Halogen hob touch controls meant easy clean, but with induction it's easy clean anyway nothing gets baked on so not required.
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Postby Trikie » Wed Apr 06, 2016 4:56 pm

Thank you for the reply ericmark.
I did post this on another forum as well so that if I got same answer I would feel better about it. The other answer I got pretty much said the same thin and also said the a 32a could cope with up to 15kw and also suggested the same connection as you so I am more than happy with that and again thanks for taking the time to reply.
Trikie
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Postby ericmark » Wed Apr 06, 2016 11:42 pm

Yep I had seen it. called yourself hoq on that forum.
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