Areas of raised accent paint


Postby maria7823 » Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:13 pm

Ten years ago, I painted my son's room with a metallic paint and then used a darker accent color applied with a feather duster. I would like to repaint the room; some of the accent color is raised, where I can feel it when running my hands over it. I have sanded, heated the spots with a hair dryer (don't laugh, that's all I had on hand) It's very tedious work and am getting frustrated. Is there something that would would speed this up? I am going to skim coat the walls before painting, but want to make sure the walls are smooth first. If you don't have an answer for this, I guess I'll be in there for a while! :cry:
Thanks! Maria
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Postby rosebery » Thu Mar 12, 2009 12:29 am

Skimming over paint is not a good idea - you'll just be waiting for it all to fall off in due time.

Did you sand by hand or power sand? Latter should fix it the you can just paint again.

Cheers
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Postby maria7823 » Thu Mar 12, 2009 3:33 pm

There are a couple sheetrock repairs that needed to be done, where I went from stud to stud. There are a number of smaller holes that need to be fixed, in addition to stick pin holes, nail holes. (Having boys is very trying! I've threatened them if they put any holes in their walls again, they have two paint color options: Pretty in Pink, and Enchanted Princess).

I have sanded with with paper and with an electric sander with a grid-like paper . So tell me the order of things to be done before I paint. You said that skim coating is not a good idea. Should I prime the walls? Then skim coat, sand, clean up, and then paint? Someone mentioned in a post of using a rubbing compound, and in another post a product was mentioned, that worked wonders. They said to look at such and such a post, but I couldn't find it.

These are Disney-themed rooms that I am doing for them, with multiple colors, stenciling, drawings -- not just a one-color-done-in-a-few-hours painting! (Sigh)
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Postby rosebery » Sun Mar 15, 2009 9:31 pm

"There are a couple sheetrock repairs that needed to be done"

You in the US? Over here we cal it plasterboard.

"I've threatened them if they put any holes in their walls again, they have two paint color options: Pretty in Pink, and Enchanted Princess)."

Ouch - bet that concentrated the minds a bit!

"You said that skim coating is not a good idea."

I said that skimming over a painted surface was not a good idea. You should have been able to sand the raised paint back using a combination of hand and power sanding to get a flat surface.

"Should I prime the walls? Then skim coat, sand, clean up, and then paint?"

I'd be tempted once you have your flat surface to go over it with a white acrylic undercoat to act as an obliterator for different p[aint colours underneath. Then you can proceed with your themed painting as you said below.

"Someone mentioned in a post of using a rubbing compound, and in another post a product was mentioned, that worked wonders. They said to look at such and such a post, but I couldn't find it."

Not on this forum - where else have you been asking?

"These are Disney-themed rooms that I am doing for them, with multiple colors, stenciling, drawings -- not just a one-color-done-in-a-few-hours painting!"

Sounds like fun!

Cheers
Last edited by rosebery on Sun Mar 15, 2009 11:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby maria7823 » Sun Mar 15, 2009 11:46 pm

I did find it: it's called Home Strip, manufactured by Eco Solutions, and on the tub it says Pain and Varnish Remover.

I have sanded with the electric sander and, unfortunately, some spots went down to the sheetrock, leaving a small circle on the wall without the base color paint. I then used 100 grid sandpaper by hand to smooth those spots down. The raised paint kind of gradually rolled off, which is why I kept sanding, leaving the slightly indented holes.

There are a lot of imperfections on the walls that need to be filled in with spackel. Should I just do those small spots (which are many). sand them down and then use the white acrylic undercoat? I skim coated by other son's room; trust me . . . if I don't have to do that, I reallyyyyyy don't mind!!

Thanks for all your help! maria
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Postby rosebery » Mon Mar 16, 2009 11:07 pm

"I did find it: it's called Home Strip, manufactured by Eco Solutions, and on the tub it says Paint and Varnish Remover."

Its very good for certain jobs.


"I have sanded with the electric sander and, unfortunately, some spots went down to the sheetrock," leaving a small circle on the wall without the base color paint."

Grit too coarse and pressed on sander too hard.


"The raised paint kind of gradually rolled off,"

Thats an effect of heat caused by friction rather than abrasion.


"sheetrock" "Spackle"

Yes - you are in the good ol USofA aren't you?


"There are a lot of imperfections on the walls that need to be filled in with spackel. Should I just do those small spots (which are many). sand them down and then use the white acrylic undercoat?"

I'd say yes.

Cheers


Edited to put back in the comment about Home Strip which the mod removed for some reason.
rosebery
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