Basement Conversion


Postby TomA » Wed Nov 05, 2008 2:28 pm

I have an existing basement that I am converting into additional living space. At present the basement has virtually no damp so I'm debating exactly what to do to treat it as the Rolls Royce job of full membrane and sump/pump is a bit of an overkill but not sure whether I can risk just standard dry lining with no membrane. Has anyone carried out any similar conversions where damp was minimal?
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Postby eljaybee » Thu Nov 06, 2008 11:41 am

You may find that your local building regs surveyor will require some form of tanking to be done
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Postby TomA » Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:12 pm

I thought that but when I spoke to the inspector he said that the damp proofing wasn't covered by the buildings regs?!?!
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Postby no1son » Tue Nov 25, 2008 10:36 pm

tanalised lathes at 400mm centres covered over with visqueen to hold back any problems insulate with polystyrene sheeting(20mm) finish off with moisture resistant plasterboards skimmed to 3mm,use drywall screws rather than clout nails in case you disturb the lathes.
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Postby the specialist » Wed Dec 31, 2008 11:04 am

[quote="TomA"]I have an existing basement that I am converting into additional living space. At present the basement has virtually no damp so I'm debating exactly what to do to treat it as the Rolls Royce job of full membrane and sump/pump is a bit of an overkill but not sure whether I can risk just standard dry lining with no membrane. Has anyone carried out any similar conversions where damp was minimal?[/quote]

You say the basement has minimal damp! Please bear in mind that the damp may look minimal due to the fact that it is evapourating into the air and then probably venting to outside or upstairs.
If you simply dry line as mentioned the moisture trapped behind will increase and drain out at the bottom. This will rot skirting boards and ruin floor coverings. I know its tempting to go for the easier cheaper option but this will prove to be wrong. If you go for the full membrane system you will see the moisture globules through the membrane by the next morning. Also the building inspector should need to see the waterproofing system and should advise you on the levels of insulation and fire protection required to satisfy the building regs. After all you need the certificate from the council if you want to use it as habitable living space. This also makes your investment worthwhile as the property will be valued accordingly should you ever sell.

Hope this helps.

A
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Postby TheDoctor5 » Fri Jan 30, 2009 9:57 am

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