Bathroom laminates


Postby 3magnet » Wed Oct 17, 2007 12:32 pm

When I lay new laminates onto my existing bathroom floor which is wooden floorboards, what do I do when I get to my WC & basin? Do I have to lift my WC & basin to lay the laminates, or do I lay it around, if so, how do I do this?
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Postby thedoctor » Wed Oct 17, 2007 4:37 pm

Cut cardboard templates by trial and error round the obsticles then transfer these shapes to the boards. Allow at least 10mm for expansion and fill the gap with flooring sealant
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Postby Ken Woodchef » Wed Oct 17, 2007 11:11 pm

Hi, I would be wary about laying Laminate flooring in a Bathroom due to the 'water' issue. There are specific ranges of laminate flooring designed for use in kitchens and bathrooms, but even these will have severe restrictions attached to them to ensure they are not affected by spilled water. Most laminate floors are made a fibre board core, and if water penetrates into this core it is likely to swell and damage will result.

Certain manufacturers do make make bathroom laminate flooring but may stipulate that the floor must be installed using the "floating floor" principle. Toilets, bidets, pedestals and some free-standing baths need to be anchored to the floor, but fixing them through the laminate can stop the floor from "floating" and invalidate any guarantee.

Hope this helps.

Ken
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Postby 3magnet » Thu Oct 18, 2007 7:05 am

[quote="thedoctor"]Cut cardboard templates by trial and error round the obsticles then transfer these shapes to the boards. Allow at least 10mm for expansion and fill the gap with flooring sealant[/quote]
Hi Doc,
I will be replacing the existing WC & basin set with another WC & basin, so would it work the same by joining sections of the laminate first, then standing the WC & basin pedestal onto the laminate and trace the footprint onto that for cutting out?
Thanks for the tip.
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Postby 3magnet » Thu Oct 18, 2007 7:17 am

Hi there,
I fully agree with you that there is a risk using laminates in the bathroom with the moisture content.
We got some laminates from a chain store supplier and they advised us that the floors we had are not ideally suited for a bathroom, but that we can seal the joints by using the glue they provide and that to reduce the chances of damage; to open the window after having a bath/shower to get rid of the moisture build-up in the bathroom.
Is this advise acceptable, or should we demand proper suitable laminates for the bathroom?
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Postby Ken Woodchef » Fri Oct 19, 2007 7:18 am

Hi, I would always recommend the right product for any particular application, but then wouldn't anyone.

Bathroom laminates are made using water resistant bonding agents in the manufacture, so are inherently resistant, but like with any project, you can chance your luck and may never have a problem.

Water has a knack of seeking out weaknesses in any installation, so if using non resistant Laminates, I would make sure your all joints are well sealed with Silicone mastic around the sanitary ware, keep a good aim and shake your leg before getting out the bath :-)

Good luck.

Ken
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