Bedside Lamps


Postby RichD » Wed May 05, 2010 3:00 pm

I am looking to install a bedside lamp which will be wired from an existing ring main using a FCU with a 3A fuse.

I am having an issue with regard to how I wire this as I would like a wall monuted switch that will be used to switch lamp on and off and also a flex outlet point for the lamp to be wired into.

The wiring would be simple if I didnt require the wall switch as I would use a fused and switched FCU. However I want the switch to be separate. The only thought I have is to switch the live on the 'load' side of FCU and then use connector block to connect the switched live back to the flex. This would all be contained in the FCU? Is this the best way? Is connector block exceptable?

Thanks
Rich
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Postby ericmark » Thu May 06, 2010 6:10 pm

Using a switch backing box as a junction box is becoming more common with the silly spot lights being used which don't use a ceiling rose as a JB. However as to if permitted much would depend on where. In a house one can normally get away with this but in commercial premises like a hotel then they may be a little stricter.

The idea of a free standing bedside lamp hard wired into the wall is not really the way forward. Normally we would use an MK 5 amp socket and plug so it can still be removed for cleaning etc. I say MK as they are shuttered so OK for UK.

Using the grid switch system you may be able to combine plug and fuse holder into one unit. Think K5833 is socket part number.
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Postby RichD » Sat May 08, 2010 10:03 pm

thanks for your reply. I like the idea of the MK sockets and this makes sense.

However how do I switch the lamps on and off using a wall switch at bedside cabinet height and have the socket at skirting board height i.e not sure how to switch the socket without resorting to connector block for the switched live

Thanks
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Postby ericmark » Mon May 10, 2010 9:54 pm

There is no real reason not to use block connectors but if you use double pole switches then it can be avoided. i.e. Switch both "lives" both line and neutral.

Note:- Both line (Phase) and neutral are considered as "live".
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