can this roof be repaired ?


Postby B127 » Tue Dec 15, 2009 9:16 am

or is a new roof advised?
Opinions appreciated.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/70673987@N00/4186622363/
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Postby rosebery » Tue Dec 15, 2009 12:17 pm

Looks fine TBH. You only have a few (20) obviously broken tiles that need replacing. Rule of thumb is count and double. So 40 tiles should see that straight again.

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Postby rosebery » Tue Dec 15, 2009 12:25 pm

Just noticed that this is your second thread about this roof the first asking if a teeny bit of efflorescence was indicative of needing a new roof. Did you see my reply?

I'm starting to get the impression that you really just want rid of this roof and are determined have a new one fitted.

If thats your decision then I suggest you go ahead. For me its just a few tiles need replacing. Couple of hundred quid against 000's. But it's your roof!

Cheers
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Postby B127 » Tue Dec 15, 2009 3:01 pm

:?:
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Postby B127 » Tue Dec 15, 2009 5:10 pm

No, I don't want to get rid of the roof but I've had such widely differing opinions from people who have seen it that I'm genuinely confused about what to do.
One roofing company looked at it and said that it doesn't need a new roof but just needs about 40 tiles replaced and repointing of the chimney stack.
Another roofing company today said that I should either do nothing or have a new roof, and that it wasn't worth repairing as the tiles are delaminating.
Another company said yesterday that they wouldn't want to repair it because the tiles are delaminating.
I think many of the tiles are delaminating - but then they have been doing so for years.
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Postby rosebery » Tue Dec 15, 2009 5:24 pm

[quote="B127"]:?:[/quote]

Whats that supposed to mean?

Cheers
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Postby B127 » Wed Dec 16, 2009 8:06 am

It's just a mistake. Sorry.
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Postby rosebery » Wed Dec 16, 2009 10:06 pm

"No, I don't want to get rid of the roof but I've had such widely differing opinions from people who have seen it that I'm genuinely confused about what to do."

My apologies I misread what you were saying.


"One roofing company looked at it and said that it doesn't need a new roof but just needs about 40 tiles replaced and repointing of the chimney stack.
Another roofing company today said that I should either do nothing or have a new roof, and that it wasn't worth repairing as the tiles are delaminating.
Another company said yesterday that they wouldn't want to repair it because the tiles are delaminating."

My interpretation of these is as follows:

Company 1 gave you a sensible and practical answer. Its also an honest answer.

Company 2 and Company 3 have both talked up the job because they want you to buy a new roof from them (don't know your size but prolly somewhere between £ 3 and £ 10k) and think that by telling you this that is exactly what you will think.


"I think many of the tiles are delaminating - but then they have been doing so for years."

Yes mines the same (30s roof? I did ask but you didn't say) and most roofs of that age with clay tiles will be showing this trait to a certain extent. One of my neighbours had a side extension which involved completely reroofing the house. The original tiles were on their way to the skip. I now have about 250 stacked up in the yard for replacements for my own as and when needed. Theres prolly at least another 20 years left in my roof and I expect yours will be the same unless there are timber issues giving rise to structural problems. Having said that there is a terrace of houses further away from me where the ridge timbers are sagging so that it looks like a banana. It looked exactly the same when I moved in here in 1986 and its still there.

My opinion would be have the broken tiles replaced and the pointing done and don't worry about the effloresence described in your other thread.

HTH

Cheers
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Postby B127 » Thu Dec 17, 2009 3:26 pm

Thanks for your reply-much appreciated.
The quotes I've had for a new roof -all using the same materials, which are basically the interlocking concrete tiles, new battens and metal round the chimney etc- vary in quite a remarkable way. There is about a four thousand pound difference between the lowest and highest- and all offering an insurance backed guarantee for ten years. It makes me wonder how much the cost of labour varies and whether there can be that much difference between the standards of workmanship.

Also, I'm not sure if the new concrete roofs are going to much better than what I've got at the moment, because they don't overlap to the same extent.
They also look rather ugly, in my opinion.

I'm now trying to get someone I can trust to do the repairs needed, which seem to vary according to who I am. Today I was told that repointing of the chimney was not needed.
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Postby Perry525 » Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:01 pm

Like Rosebery I had a 1931 semi with a tiled roof that was de- laminating when I bought the place in 1969, over the years I bought many second hand tiles and gradually replaced the middle areas of each of a three sided roof. We never had a leak, I merely got up there each summer and replaced the tiles that were really bad. A cheap and simple way to deal with the problem.
Now days what with health and safety the cost of a commercial company repairing/replacing a roof has literally gone through the roof, the cost of insurance and scaffolding, its really not allowed for a professional company to just put up a ladder and run up and down a roof replacing a few tiles.
Your roof was designed for the weight of clay tiles, replacing clay with concrete will add a lot of extra weight and should not be attempted.
As far as tile overlap is concerned, the thing the designer will have taken into account is the level of exposure to wind blown rain. I would guess that the roof does not have a waterproof membrane.
If you do have it re tiled, then a membrane will help to collect any rain that gets in and will make the loft appear warmer by keeping out the wind and will help to keep the loft cleaner.
As far a re pointing the chimney is concerned, I recommend either getting up there and taking a close look or buy a powerful telescope or binoculars to get a good view to see if the job really needs doing. This will also enable you to check the state of the tiles from across the road or the bottom of the garden.
Question. Has the chimney been fitted with a tray to collect the rain? Is there a lead band round the chimney just above the tiled roof to indicate the presence of a tray – if there is, then there is little chance of rain making its way down the chimney via the mortar and parging.
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Postby B127 » Mon Dec 21, 2009 3:31 pm

When I thought back I remembered I'd had the chimney repointed at least twice since I bought the house, most recently about 9 years ago I think.
I don't think it needs completely repointing, but I will borrow some binoculars and have a good look.

Thanks again.
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Postby TheDoctor4 » Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:20 pm

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