Choosing the right shower


Postby tracieshafienia » Fri Aug 13, 2010 9:52 pm

We have a combination boiler downstairs in the kitchen and need to install a shower upstairs in the bathroom. Could somebody tell me the best type of shower to install and is there one which doesn't involve electrics? I have read several articles on this subject but am still none the wiser!
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Postby garethjones » Thu Aug 19, 2010 10:59 am

tracieshafienia wrote:We have a combination boiler downstairs in the kitchen and need to install a shower upstairs in the bathroom. Could somebody tell me the best type of shower to install and is there one which doesn't involve electrics? I have read several articles on this subject but am still none the wiser!


Not exactly sure, but this might help (Google "cnmonline.co.uk/Showers-amp-Accessories-c-1870.html")
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Postby Perry525 » Mon Aug 23, 2010 4:49 pm

The best shower to have and use, is one where the hot and cold water is supplied at low pressure by a cold water tank in the loft and a hot water tank(preferable in the loft) but it can be anywhere close to the shower.

The joy of a traditional low pressure system is, you can have as much hot and cold water to as many taps and toilets as you care to fit, and they can by used by several people at the same time.

You also have a back up tank of cold water, that is there at times of low pressure or indeed when the water is cut off..... essential if you have babies and young children.

Think, hotels and hospitals etc.

A combination boiler is not really suitable for a shower!
The problem is, that a combi is water pressure sensitive.
It is limited in the amount of hot water it can supply.
It can only, usually, provide enough hot water for one tap!
It cannot produce enough hot water to fill a bath, before you go to sleep, or you need to be very patient.
It really only works for a flat housing one person, it can work after a fashion, for two people, where each knows exactly what the other is doing all the time.
If you are using the shower and someone turns on another tap, or flushes the toilet, you either lose your hot water completely, get burnt or frozen.

The set up for a real hot water system, involves adding two T's to your central heating system and inserting a copper hot water tank. Adding a cold water tank in the loft at the highest position (on a platform) that you can reach and running pipes, cold to the shower, cold to the hot water tank and hot from the hot water tank to the shower.

You will need either a small header tank to allow the hot water to expand, or a small expansion cylinder, or an air vent.
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Postby PaulWhite » Fri Aug 27, 2010 8:28 am

You may have to go the power shower route. Explore both tank and power shower options and see which would suit you best.
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