Concealing 15mm pipes in plastered brick wall


Postby bemused » Tue Mar 31, 2009 12:59 pm

I'm almost at the point of bringing in a plasterer but have one small issue to get sorted first:

I'm going to hang a wash basin on a 9" external brick wall in an upstairs bathroom. The waste will exit straight through the wall, but as I'm using a semi (?) pedestal (the type that sits under the basin, screws onto the wall, but doesn't reach the floor) I would like to conceal the hot and cold feed pipes (15mm copper) in the wall below the pedestal as they rise up from below the wooden floor.

I was going to simply chase a channel in the brick and use bodge foam to hold them in place for plastering and subsequent tiling. I'm not sure foam is the best method. nor am I sure about the sequence of events. Grateful for any advice.
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Postby kbrownie » Tue Mar 31, 2009 4:42 pm

bemused,
Ideally use 20mm plastic conduit as a sleave around the pipes and clip them to wall this will mean using raw plugs. Before plastering over
The reason being that the pipes can expand and contract. This will crack your plaster.
KB
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Postby rosebery » Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:14 pm

Regs require that all pipework be accessible. Thats over with now lets be practical. You should sleeve the pipe in a larger tube to allow for expansion and contraction. The chase should be deep enough that you can plaster over the sleeving before tiling. If you don't sleeve and the pipe is too close to the surface you'll pop tiles off in due course. If you can manage it do not have any joints in the buried portion but if you do use soldered fittings and test before burying to ensure its watertight.

Whatever you do densotape is out! Its "out of the ark" stuff.

Cheers
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Postby bemused » Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:15 am

Many thanks guys; plastic sleeves it is!

Cheers
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Postby kbrownie » Fri Apr 03, 2009 4:44 am

Hi Rosebury,
Interesting comment about regulation saying all pipework should be accessible.
I can do a bit of plumbing and do have some qualification. Not a plumber though and would never pretend to be one.
All pipework accessible? Surely not? How can this be logical. Does that mean if I decided to put a raditor in a room with out one, that all pipes need to be surface mounted and if I decided to tile the floor the pipework under the floor boards would need to be installed above FFL?
KB
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Postby rosebery » Tue Apr 07, 2009 8:56 pm

Sorry KB only just seen your reply.

I'm talking about pipes buried in walls. Sorry if I was unclear.

If compression fittings have been used they must be accessible. Pushfits should never be used in a buried situation.

The best solution is no fittings at all - out with the pipe bender.

Cheers
rosebery
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Postby kbrownie » Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:28 am

Rosebury
that makes sense, but what about yorkshire fits/end feeds?
I have another question for you but I'll post it on building controls
later
KB
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Postby rosebery » Wed Apr 08, 2009 5:41 pm

Soldered joints at the max. Preferably no joints at all.

Cheers
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Postby kbrownie » Thu Apr 09, 2009 6:50 pm

Just as well i'm not too bad at the old bending, that is pipes i'm talking about.
KB
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Postby rosebery » Wed Apr 15, 2009 6:07 am

"Just as well i'm not too bad at the old bending, that is pipes i'm talking about."

Ohh err missus!
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