Condensation


Postby stuarta » Wed Dec 12, 2007 9:55 am

Can someone help or advise me please.

I've just moved into a new 2 bed upstairs level of a maisonette. The building is only 13 years old but has wooden windows and no central heating. The only source of heating was in the living room from a balanced flue gas fire which we've now replaced with an electric suite.

All the windows suffer from condensation and therefore have the trickle vents open. We were advised when we bought the place that the windows would need replacing as they've got a bit rotten in places. The worse window however is in our small bedroom, which is so bad there is a small hole in the plaster board around the window box. We've also placed salt in a small glass on the cills as I was advised that this was a good solution as well.

Problem I can see, is that as the bedrooms do'nt have any heating, that maybe this is causing the problem? Again, our small bedroom gets so cold that in fact when I went in there last night, as i breathed you could see the vapour in my breath.

We don't however use this bedroom, only as a study and the main bedroom isn't too bad when we place bottles in the bed first. We've placed a thick curtain behind the front door which also gets wet and I'm looking at getting new uPVC windows in asap.

Will this solve the problem though? I'm assuming I will still get the condensation due to lack of heating but hopefully the new ones won't rot and should retain more heat. Maybe then I should just contemplate getting a free standing heater for the small bedroom should it get cold.

I would be grateful for some advise please.

Thanks
stuarta
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 9:47 am

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Postby DUDE DIY » Fri Dec 14, 2007 11:50 am

Can someone help or advise me please.

I've just moved into a new 2 bed upstairs level of a maisonette. The building is only 13 years old but has wooden windows and no central heating. The only source of heating was in the living room from a balanced flue gas fire which we've now replaced with an electric suite.

All the windows suffer from condensation and therefore have the trickle vents open. We were advised when we bought the place that the windows would need replacing as they've got a bit rotten in places. The worse window however is in our small bedroom, which is so bad there is a small hole in the plaster board around the window box. We've also placed salt in a small glass on the cills as I was advised that this was a good solution as well.

Problem I can see, is that as the bedrooms do'nt have any heating, that maybe this is causing the problem? Again, our small bedroom gets so cold that in fact when I went in there last night, as i breathed you could see the vapour in my breath.

We don't however use this bedroom, only as a study and the main bedroom isn't too bad when we place bottles in the bed first. We've placed a thick curtain behind the front door which also gets wet and I'm looking at getting new uPVC windows in asap.

Will this solve the problem though? I'm assuming I will still get the condensation due to lack of heating but hopefully the new ones won't rot and should retain more heat. Maybe then I should just contemplate getting a free standing heater for the small bedroom should it get cold.

I would be grateful for some advise please.

Thanks

Hi I hope my advice helps. The main cause of condensation on windows is the warmer air on the inside of your house hitting the cold window pain, which is made cold on the outside of your house. So the warmer you house the more condenstaion. Double glazing should solve this problem, as its 2 pains of glass which form a barrier stoping the warm internal air hitting the cold pain. When you get the fitters to provide a quote for the work mention to them that you want the walls with small holes around the window frames made good as well. They would normally do this anyway. Best advice is get several quotes and avoid the big name companys. They generally over charge for poor quality windows. Have a look at other peoples pvc windows to get an idea of the style you want, maybe even speak to your nieghbours who have had windows fitted they may be able to recommend a good local firm. I say again avoid the big name window companys and get a several companys into quote. Hope this helps. Dude.
DUDE DIY
Posts: 115
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 10:34 am


Postby stuarta » Fri Dec 14, 2007 12:00 pm

ok thank you. I've already had one company trying to scam me which I guess I better not mention.

I understand about the hot air inside hitting cold out, but this isn't the case with our place. The rooms are cold, especially the 2 bedrooms which have no heat in them at all.

This is what's confusing me
stuarta
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 9:47 am


Postby dcmoore » Fri Dec 14, 2007 4:19 pm

I would definately agree that the windows are the root of the problem so getting them replaced is your best, longterm solution to improving the temperature of your house and make sure these have small vents to improve air circulation too.
Although you dont have your heating on condensation can still occur from our body temprature (thats why it often occurs worse behind beds because of our breathing at night)

There is another solution to the temperature of your walls. There is a plastic, airgap membrane that you can line your interior walls with and this simple method can ad warmth to your walls and stop the damp from showing through.
Another cheaper solution is to perhaps invest in a dehumidifier. I too suffer from a cold house and have found this to be the best way to keep my house dry and warm, so much so that i dont always need my radiators on

I hope this is useful to you. Please let me know if you would like me to ellaborate on anything. Otherwise, all the best!
dcmoore
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 3:02 pm


Postby stuarta » Fri Dec 14, 2007 9:44 pm

Well rang a window company today to try and get them in for quote while off next week and they actually came round today. I got a very good deal and should hopefully have them fitted beginning of January.

This will give us chance to try them out while it's still cold and then maybe get prepared for next winter if we still have a problem.

My theory being that if they do get wet with condensation, at least there won't be any wood to rot.

I was advised against trickle vents, hope this is ok.

Thanks for all the help.
stuarta
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 9:47 am


Postby dcmoore » Mon Dec 17, 2007 4:27 pm

That should be fine without. If you do get any condensation on your window just open it a notch and this should get rid of it. Hope everything gets sorted!
dcmoore
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 3:02 pm


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