Connecting a storage heater


Postby ghawdxi » Wed Jan 06, 2010 9:36 pm

hi,
is it ok/safe if connect a storage heater by simply fitting it with a heavy duty plug and inserting it into a conventional electric wall socket?
many thanks
ghawdxi
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Postby ericmark » Thu Jan 07, 2010 4:33 pm

It would be a little pointless. The whole idea is to heat with cheap off peak power and then for a slow release of the heat over a long period.

There are other times when they are used for example one place I worked did not have enough power in the day when the machines were running.

Although they would work by plugging in the lack of control would mean it would all be rather pointless.
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Postby sparx » Thu Jan 07, 2010 4:50 pm

Hi. not advisable or desirable since storage heaters run for many hours at a time and are meant to only be on during off peak rate times.
You would need time clock and the plug through type won't last long at max load so unless the storage heater is considerably less than 3 kW you will have a potential overheat/fire risk in middle of the night!
What's a 'heavy-duty plug'?, all 13A domestic plugs are rubbish! imho!
Would never run one at full load for more than a short time,
eg 230volts X 13A = 2990W (2.99kW) so 3 kW is overloading plug and it will get hot!
Further any fixed load of more than 3kW should be on its own circuit, eg immersion heater, so not good practice anyway.
regards Sparx
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Postby ghawdxi » Thu Jan 07, 2010 5:02 pm

Thanks Sparx
can i therefore connect it via a "cooker main switch" type socket?
i.e. those sockets that have a big red switch and a socket right next to it.
The reason i am asking is that i plan to fit the heater close to a double electric socket and was thinking of using that as the main source of power supply.
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Postby sparx » Thu Jan 07, 2010 5:10 pm

see also Ericmarks reply,
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Postby ghawdxi » Thu Jan 07, 2010 5:20 pm

Thanks Sparx/Ericmark,
i do have other storage heaters fitted around my apartment and those are connected with a dedicated switch (and no sockets). apologies but i do not know their technical name. do these type of switches solve the timing issue?
what do you recommend that i do in my situation then?
are there any switch/socket configurations that solve my problem?
shall i just forget about storage heaters and buy a conventional electric heater instead?
many thanks in advance
ghawdxi
ghawdxi
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Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 8:12 pm


Postby ericmark » Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:25 pm

There are different methods used and without testing to see which any answer could be wrong.

However most likely is you have a dedicated consumer unit to run off peak heaters and a number of outlets most likely fused connection units for these to be connected to and they will only heat when the consumer unit is made live during off peak times.

But some systems have an arrangement where the timer is included in the heater rather than at the consumer unit as this will then permit a boost function.

If you fit incorrectly you could end up with a very high electric bill. So I would recommend you get an electrician to fit the unit so he can ensure it is all correct.
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Postby ghawdxi » Fri Jan 08, 2010 11:58 am

thank you
your advice is really useful
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Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 8:12 pm


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