CORGI or DIY??


Postby arcticgoldfish » Mon Jul 07, 2008 9:15 am

Hi,

I had a range cooker delivered yesterday. In the kitchen, behind the cooker is the connection to the gas supply. On the cooker, there are two gas inputs - one on each side, with one blanked off, the other with a screw fit. I don't want the pipe to run across the back of the oven so need to swap the blank and screw fit over, then connect to the gas supply - which looks like the bayonet connection.

Now the question, I was going to nip to B&Q, buy the pipe and connection and do it myself - I think I am OK at DIY, though admittedly I have not done gas pipes before.

I called to get a couple of quotes from CORGI registered;

1) £120 + VAT to fit, all in - told me that any range cooker needs a CORGI certificate which he would apply for after fitting.

2) £85 + VAT to fit, plus £12 for the extra pipe. No mention of a CORGI certificate.

So, do I need a certificate, in which case I have to go CORGI or can I do it myself. Does £120 + VAT seem a bot steep for what is going to be a quick job?

Thanks.
arcticgoldfish
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Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 1:31 pm

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Postby htg engineer » Mon Jul 07, 2008 11:24 am

There's no need for a CORGI certificate for a gas cooker installation.

The prices are a bit steep - I wouldn't pay it (or charge it), you can get it done cheaper.

I fitted a cooker last week, supplying wing back elbow, cooker hose, bayonet and stability chain. I charged £50.

To plug and unplug a cooker into a bayonet fitting, you do not need to be CORGI registered, these are designed so that the cookers can be removed and replaced easily for cleaning purposes etc.

To install a gas cooker, fitting a new hose - then yes you need a CORGI registered installer. that's why they do not supply cooker hoses with gas cookers anymore.

htg
htg engineer
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Postby arcticgoldfish » Wed Jul 09, 2008 8:01 am

[quote="htg engineer"]There's no need for a CORGI certificate for a gas cooker installation.

The prices are a bit steep - I wouldn't pay it (or charge it), you can get it done cheaper.

I fitted a cooker last week, supplying wing back elbow, cooker hose, bayonet and stability chain. I charged £50.

To plug and unplug a cooker into a bayonet fitting, you do not need to be CORGI registered, these are designed so that the cookers can be removed and replaced easily for cleaning purposes etc.

To install a gas cooker, fitting a new hose - then yes you need a CORGI registered installer. that's why they do not supply cooker hoses with gas cookers anymore.

htg[/quote]

Strange - I replied to this the other day but it seems to have gone missing!!

Thanks for the info. If I don't need a CORGI certificate, how would anyone (insurance etc) ever know that it was a CORGI registered installer? Do I need to get an invoice confirming CORGI registered?

You have talked me into getting a CORGI around to install though, as have my colleagues. I had to take a family member to hospital yesterday and my colleagues assumed my gas installation was the cause of the hospital trip!! :D

Don't suppose anyone can recommend someone in the Coulsdon / Sutton area?
arcticgoldfish
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 1:31 pm


Postby htg engineer » Wed Jul 09, 2008 2:13 pm

I've never known an insurance company ask for that kind of information. A gas cooker belongs to the occupier, either the owner or the tenant. Therefore is not classed as the fixtures and fittings of the house.

If you moved you would probably take the cooker with you, if you left it, that would be between you and the purchaser and it would be up to them to have it checked. The boiler would be left and is part of the house - this is why this needs certification.

htg

I have replied toa few posts on here and they have never appeared in the forum, must be something to do with changing the server - posts being lost.
htg engineer
Posts: 3193
Joined: Tue May 22, 2007 5:22 pm


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