cost of accessing a water supply in somebody else's land


Postby mikerwilliams » Sun Oct 25, 2009 11:32 am

Hi, I am trying to access a domestic water supply for a new build. Unfortunately, I live in a very rural area and there is no main running along the roadside. This means I have to approach other land owners (through whose land a main does run) to try to secure access to water. So far I have approached three such landowners, one of whom has turned me down flat, another who wants £5,000 compensation and a third who wants £2,000 compensation. The distance I have to travel across other's land is only about 20 metres (through open fields), and the compensation being asked for seems rather extreme. Is there a yardstick available to help work out what would be a reasonable and just level of compensation, or do I have to 'bite the bullet' and pay up? Mike - Anglesey
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Postby htg engineer » Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:01 pm

If it's their land then they can name the price.

Have you contacted your local water company ? it's their pipework and you cannot just tap into it.


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Postby mikerwilliams » Sun Oct 25, 2009 4:31 pm

Yes, water company ok. Average cost locally to cross land appears to be around £200 for the sort of access I need, but it looks as though I will have to grin and bear it while getting ripped off! Many thanks anyway - Mike
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Postby hamish72 » Fri Oct 30, 2009 4:08 pm

[quote="mikerwilliams"]Yes, water company ok. Average cost locally to cross land appears to be around £200 for the sort of access I need, but it looks as though I will have to grin and bear it while getting ripped off! Many thanks anyway - Mike[/quote]


Make damn sure the agreement is legally tied up or should you fall out with the other party in future bang goes your water

you could become liable for shared maintenance of his supply

so I would say you can add a good solicitors fees to the cost :x
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Postby plumbbob » Fri Oct 30, 2009 11:53 pm

I am a little surprised actually that the water company will allow your main to cross other peoples land. Usually the only way the inspector will pass any installation is if it goes directly to your boundary then out into the footpath or street which is council owned.

This is simply because neither you nor the water company will have control over the supply if it is routed any other way. Any future owner of that land could damage, cut or refuse your request to repair the supply and there would be nothing you could do about it.

In the past I have had to pay for an extension to 4" water main in a street to gain approval!
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Postby mikerwilliams » Sun Nov 01, 2009 11:30 am

[quote="plumbbob"]I am a little surprised actually that the water company will allow your main to cross other peoples land. Usually the only way the inspector will pass any installation is if it goes directly to your boundary then out into the footpath or street which is council owned.

This is simply because neither you nor the water company will have control over the supply if it is routed any other way. Any future owner of that land could damage, cut or refuse your request to repair the supply and there would be nothing you could do about it.

In the past I have had to pay for an extension to 4" water main in a street to gain approval![/quote]

The way it works is that you pay the land owner to access the water main that runs through his property(in this case he is asking for £2,000 +). You also have to pay (around £1,000) to the water company to connect you to the main. You then have to take out an esement (about £800) which allows indefinite access to your pipe (the part which runs through somebody else's land) should there be a need e.g in the event of accidental damage to the pipe. The water company absolves itself of any responsibility for the laying of the supply pipe, or its maintenance thereafter, apart from the first metre wich joins onto their main. In effect this means that you are responsible for the installation, maintenance and repair costs of the pipe which runs from the water main to your property, and the water company classifies it as a "private" supply.
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