DAMP RISING UP OVER DAMP COURSE


Postby surreygirl » Wed Jul 08, 2009 3:07 pm

I had a damp course put in some 20 years ago as well as tanking and altough there is no damp where the flat was tanked damp seems to be coming up over the damp course which was only done half way up! I wondered whether I could inject the walls myself or whether it would be a big job ie the plaster needs removing! it is very unsighly as the walls seem to bubble out and the plaster fall away. Any suggestions!
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Postby rosebery » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:45 pm

This sounds more like penetrating damp than rising damp. I think you need a professional to come and look at the problem for you.

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Postby surreygirl » Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:38 am

They are internal walls and not outside walls, although I did forget to say that the flat is a basement flat. It could be caused I suppose by condensation but it is the fact that the brick work is crumpling which worries me.

Also the flat next door is let and the chap in there as far as I can see never has a window open and at times water is quite literally dripping in bucket loads from the windows and when I had a peek in his flat one day the whole of the walls were black. I am not sure if this would affect my own flat next door! apparently the Landlord has never visited or inspected the flat since he moved in and that was seven years ago :cry:
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Postby col111 » Mon Jul 13, 2009 10:09 am

If the plaster is coming off the walls it may necessary that the rest of the wall needs to be tanked as well - replastering.
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Postby surreygirl » Mon Jul 27, 2009 12:40 pm

Is tanking the same as damp proofing! It is fine where I have had it damp proofed (is that how you spell it). But there is damp coming up over the original damp proofing!
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Postby col111 » Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:04 pm

[quote="surreygirl"]Is tanking the same as damp proofing! It is fine where I have had it damp proofed (is that how you spell it). But there is damp coming up over the original damp proofing![/quote]

Yes, when damp proofing a basement it is "tanked". The damp is not rising above the treated area, it is probably penetrating damp -i.e. it is coming through the wall sideways from the ground on the other side of the wall. The whole wall should have been treated not just part of it.
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Postby surreygirl » Tue Jul 28, 2009 7:05 am

Well the kitchen was tanked ie the whole wall done. But the problem is is that the damp coming up over the damp course ie only halfway up the wall is the internal walls ie the wall seperating the kitchen from the lounge and the party internal wall to the next door flat. This is the worst affected area, that is the wall inbetween the two flats.

Can this be rising damp, it cant be penetrative damp from the outside because they walls are internal!
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Postby col111 » Tue Jul 28, 2009 12:10 pm

[quote="surreygirl"]Well the kitchen was tanked ie the whole wall done. But the problem is is that the damp coming up over the damp course ie only halfway up the wall is the internal walls ie the wall seperating the kitchen from the lounge and the party internal wall to the next door flat. This is the worst affected area, that is the wall inbetween the two flats.

Can this be rising damp, it cant be penetrative damp from the outside because they walls are internal![/quote]

Now I understand. In this case the problem is probably condensation (although rising damp can rise to 1.5 metres in extreme cases). Is there an air extractor or window in the kitchen? The usual solution to condensation is to improve ventilation and/or use a dehumidifier. Re-plastering may still be necessary if ventilation does not solve it.
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