Electrical Inspection and Test


Postby CH » Mon Apr 21, 2008 9:29 am

I am about to start wiring my new utility room extension, ring main, lights etc. I am a qualified electrician but have no inspection or test certs. The last regs course I did was 15th edition. The building inspector will inspect the first fix for Part P, but says I will have to have the final installation inspected and tested to pass building control.
Can anybody explain this procedure, what forms have to be filled in? how much of the work can I do? etc.
CH
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
75%
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:59 am

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby ericmark » Mon Apr 21, 2008 7:02 pm

I would expect you can do all the work yourself.
1. Follow links in Projects to Part P and down load the form once you read it yourself I am sure you will agree not really a problem biggest problem is to get hold of a earth loop impedance tester with traceable records.
2. If you go to IEE or now called IET web site you can down load the forms which when printed do not have On Line Version written all over them.
Once you have read the Part P form come back and ask more. There are some changes 15 to 17th edition but not so many as it should cause a problem. Main thing is RCD protection on nearly all. But I can't really see a problem.
ericmark

Postby CH » Tue Apr 22, 2008 7:33 am

Thanks for the quick reply, I have downloaded the part P docs. but not read them yet. One question, if I extend the ground floor ring main in to my utility extension will I have to bring the circuit protection up to the current standard? At the moment it is on re-wireable fuses.
CH
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
75%
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:59 am

Postby ericmark » Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:36 pm

Most of the re-wirable fuses have cartridge or MCB options. So that should not be a problem. There are some odd rules which make your position unusual in that where the installation is under the control of a skilled person you can get away with some things the general public can't as to if building control would accept this I am not sure but under the new regs you don't have to use RCD's to protect cables because your an electrician but I would think if you ever came to sell the house there would be a problem. All my re-wireable fuses have been changed for the plug in MCB's just needs careful removal of window in fuse cover. Very easy to smash. Do remember Part P is written for the DIY man and very easy to pick holes in it. And in the main the building control try all they can to stop you doing DIY work as they don't really know what is allowed in the main they have very little electrical training you need to reassure them you know exactly what you are doing even if you don't. Part M may also be of interest to you. Sockets 400 to 1000 high no closer than 350 to corner etc. Again not well written for example anything needing to be closely viewed to read etc between 1200 and 1400 but push buttons below 1200 so impossible to mount a touch screen at correct height. Many say the min height is 450mm but reading Part M it says 400mm so to avoid problems 450mm may be better. Again it does say floor mounting is also allowed so some common sense must be used.
ericmark

Postby CH » Wed Apr 23, 2008 7:24 am

Think I will replece comsumer unit, as existing is only 6 way. Will have this job complete before end of June (17th ed) so going to fit a standard split load board.
Does this present any other problems?
CH
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
75%
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:59 am

Postby ericmark » Wed Apr 23, 2008 1:22 pm

I would check on prices local wholesaler here is selling consumer units with RCBO's priced at £12.5 each half the price they were a few months back and with that price is it really worth using a split board or is it better to use RCBO's on every circuit needing earth leakage. This way you are future proof and all you need to do to comply with 17th is exchange any MCB's for RCBO's if it were me either go for three way split board with 2 RCB's and space for one or two RCBO's or no split and use all RCBO's not really worth using a soon to be obsolete board. But prices are all over the place at the moment and you do need to shop around I know screwfix is well behind at the moment and it seems to be the smaller wholesalers who are giving good deals. Maybe screwfix's stock is too high?
ericmark

Postby CH » Sat May 03, 2008 8:57 pm

I have already got a MK split load board but will use RCBO's on the non RCD side.
The original comsumer unit is located in the down stairs cloakroom, 1.5m above the wash hand basin. Is it ok to keep the same location for the new CU or will it have to be move?
CH
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
75%
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:59 am

Postby ericmark » Sun May 04, 2008 3:47 am

As far as I can see hand wash basins do not count as far as 17th is concerned. Unless it comes under Section 702 of which I doubt. Haven't got a 16th to hand. I think only if in a bathroom did a sink count?
ericmark

Postby sparx » Mon May 05, 2008 11:04 pm

Hi Eric has gone into fine detail with you but I will just say your building inspector is wrong!!!
part p regs say if you wish to DIY then if you pay their fees up front THEY must do [or arrange for someone for them] to carry out first & second fix inspection.
Another electrician is not allowed to register work he has not personally done, so in order for him to issue a certificate he would need to see your work at both stages to satisfy himself about cable routes etc.
You should get certs. to give to bldg control and keep a copy to aid a later sale.
regards SPARX
sparx
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 2166
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:33 pm
Location: The fifth continent.

Postby ericmark » Tue May 06, 2008 7:46 am

This question as to who does testing has come up many times on many forums. As I read it there are three classes of Part P.
1) Everything done by registered spark.
2) Everything done by non registered spark.
3) Everything done by DIY person.
There seems some confusion as to who does what in latter two. It seems to me to say where it is completed by a competent person the installation cert should be filled in by the electrician doing the work and the building control if they don't like the results may either test them selves of get an outside firm to test at councils expense.
But with a DIY person this changes of course.
But in the pay scales there seems to be no differential between DIY and Non registered spark fees so many consider building control should also do the testing for sparks.
The half half installation is also causing a problem where the house holder does some work and registered spark does some many consider in this case the registered spark can not use his registered status and should go through building controls.
This is why I told you to down load yourself as it is a complete shambles including it refers to BS7671:2001 and not just BS7671 so once BS7671:2008 comes into force it's legal standing also comes into question.
I understand the conservatives have promised to repeal or modify the act as was done in New Zealand where accidents with extension leads when sky high. But I wouldn't hold my breath.
ericmark

Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by



  • DIY How to Project Guides

  • DIY how to tutorial projects and guides - Did you know we have a DIY Projects section? Well, if no, then we certainly do! Within this area of our site have literally hundreds of how-to guides and tutorials that cover a huge range of home improvement tasks. Each page also comes with pictures and a video to make completing those jobs even easier!



 


  • Related Topics