Electrical Qualifications


Postby AjayK46 » Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:20 am

What is the minimum qualification I would have to get to enable me to undertake electrical work in just my own property without needing to get it checked by an electrician afterwards?
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Postby kbrownie » Wed Apr 01, 2009 3:36 pm

AjayK46,
You do not need any!
but you will need to inform your local building controls officer of the work you intend to carry out. They will inspect your work for compliance to BS7671 and APPROVED DOCUMENT PART P, look under "part p" on project pages above.
and they will charge a fee. They will then issue a cert saying the work complies to part p of building regulation. Providing it does?
Certain electrical work does not need to be notified, such adding on to existing circuit or extending them as long as not in special location such as bath/shower rooms and kitchens.
But this work is described as minor work and still needs to comply to BS7671, which means inspection and testing plus minor works cert.
KB
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Postby AjayK46 » Wed Apr 01, 2009 5:14 pm

[quote="kbrownie"]AjayK46,
You do not need any!
but you will need to inform your local building controls officer of the work you intend to carry out. They will inspect your work for compliance to BS7671 and APPROVED DOCUMENT PART P, look under "part p" on project pages above.
and they will charge a fee. They will then issue a cert saying the work complies to part p of building regulation. Providing it does?
Certain electrical work does not need to be notified, such adding on to existing circuit or extending them as long as not in special location such as bath/shower rooms and kitchens.
But this work is described as minor work and still needs to comply to BS7671, which means inspection and testing plus minor works cert.
KB[/quote]

Thank you for this information. To clarify my question though I would be interested in obtaining the electrical qualification myself so that I would not have to then get anyone else in to check it for compliance. What would be the minimum qualification I would need to just do work in my own house?
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Postby rosebery » Wed Apr 01, 2009 10:04 pm

But you also need to convince the BCO that you are "competant" before you carry out the work yourself.
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Postby acsimpson » Thu Apr 02, 2009 8:36 am

I don't believe there are any different regulations for working in your own house. So if you wanted to sign off work in your own house you would need to be fully qualified and registered with a body which allows you to sign off your own work as a competant person.

Perhaps someone could confirm if this is right.
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Postby kbrownie » Thu Apr 02, 2009 3:28 pm

ajayK46,
Minimum qualification?
It's not that simple, I'll try to explain.
To sign your own work off, you need to be registered with someone like nappit, you will have to have a minimum qualification of level 3 knowledge.
This will include BS7671:2008 and inspection and testing you will need to prove to them that you have the knowledge, experience and skill to carry out electrical work. They will inspect your work to prove it is of the required standard, You will also need to have public liabillty insurance or they won't register you.
Lots of study time needed, lots of money too, the courses, the test equipement, the insurance, the registration fee. You need to also have a probation period when you will be doing notified work.
Is this something you fancy? Lots people on here that are so generous with their knowledge if you need any further advise on how to get started.
KB
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Postby AjayK46 » Thu Apr 02, 2009 7:02 pm

[quote="kbrownie"]ajayK46,
Minimum qualification?
It's not that simple, I'll try to explain.
To sign your own work off, you need to be registered with someone like nappit, you will have to have a minimum qualification of level 3 knowledge.
This will include BS7671:2008 and inspection and testing you will need to prove to them that you have the knowledge, experience and skill to carry out electrical work. They will inspect your work to prove it is of the required standard, You will also need to have public liabillty insurance or they won't register you.
Lots of study time needed, lots of money too, the courses, the test equipement, the insurance, the registration fee. You need to also have a probation period when you will be doing notified work.
Is this something you fancy? Lots people on here that are so generous with their knowledge if you need any further advise on how to get started.
KB[/quote]

Hum - All sounds a little more complicated and expensive than I thought just for the sake of doing work in my own home.

What I am wanting to do is install a dedicated ring main to cover just my two bedrooms which currently have a limited number of sockets.

Step 1 - Exclude / bypass the existing sockets in the bedrooms from the existing two ring mains.

Step 2 - Wire a new ring main with 2.5 twin and earth which I would mainly run in mini trunking around the top edge of the skirting boards in both bedrooms. (Total cable run about 40 metres).

Step 3 - Install about 6 double sockets as part of the ring.

Step 4 - Connect to a spare slot on the fuse board with a 30/32amp MCB.

So from what I understand I can do this but immediately upon completion must get a qualified electrician in to certificate it.

Is this correct. Your help is much appreciated.
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Postby rosebery » Thu Apr 02, 2009 9:42 pm

"I don't believe there are any different regulations for working in your own house. So if you wanted to sign off work in your own house you would need to be fully qualified and registered with a body which allows you to sign off your own work as a competant person.

Perhaps someone could confirm if this is right."

Yes you are correct in that to be able to self certify you must be qualified and registered.

BUT you can still do notifiable work under Part P of the building regs if you a) can persuade the BCO BEFOREHAND that you are competant, b) provide full details of the proposed work to the BCO and c) are prepared to pay the BCOs exhorbitant charges to come over and check your work after both first and second fix. But the BCO will not issue you with the necessary certificates.

So there are aset of circimstamces where you can do notifiable work but providing yourself with the necessary 17th Edn certs is a different matter.

All too often Part P and Wiring Regs get confused. They are not the same thing

HTH

Cheers
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Postby kbrownie » Fri Apr 03, 2009 11:43 am

It's hard to say if an electrician would sign it off, as soon as they do they become responsiable for the work. It will be a new circuit which requires electrical installation certs, which will need inspection and testing schedules or it will not be valid.
The best way is to find a friendly electrician talk to them, tell them what you would like to do and see if they will offer advise and give help. Tell them your willing to do the donkey work if they are willing to inspect and test it for you.
KB
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Postby AjayK46 » Fri Apr 03, 2009 5:22 pm

Can you not get an electrician to come in and do a complete safety check and certification on all the circuits in your home anymore? I had this done once before by the electricity board responsible for my area. They were installing a new fuse board at the same time.
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Postby kbrownie » Sat Apr 04, 2009 8:10 am

You can get a PIR(periodic inspection report)
That's for an existing installation generally done every 10 years, but should also be done when change of occupancy and change of use of the building but not for new circuits.
New circuits need to be proved they comply to BS7671 before a PIR is done.
KB
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Postby rosebery » Sat Apr 04, 2009 8:29 am

Yes its called a Periodic Inspection report - PIR.

Cheers
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Postby AjayK46 » Sat Apr 04, 2009 4:38 pm

Is it OK to run parts of a ring main in surface mini trunking above the top lip of the skirting board? I know it doesn't look that good but it saves a lot of work.

Also do I have to advise anyone before I start the work or just get it checked afterwards that it complies to BS7671 and maybe a PIR?

Thank you
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Postby kbrownie » Sat Apr 04, 2009 6:04 pm

It's okay to run in trunking, the circuit must have rcd protection.
I suggest if your doing the work yourself, find an electrician that is willing to sign your work off first.
If your doing it through building controls they should be notified at least 30 days before you start the work.
Remember the new circuit still needs an EIC regardless of your intention on having a PIR on the rest of the installation at later date.
KB
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