External pipework


Postby tcno1 » Sat Oct 27, 2007 2:04 pm

Hi, is it ok to run copper pipe along an outside wall? I need to plumb in a washing machine into a converted garage which has no water supply. The nearest and easiest way to get a hot and cold feed to the washing machine seems to be via a downstairs toilet but it would mean running pipes along an outside wall for about 8 metres. Would this be ok?[/i]
tcno1
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:46 am

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby bobplum » Sat Oct 27, 2007 2:42 pm

yes but they would need to be insulated and preferably boxed in
fit isolating valves in side the house so in the event of problems the pipes can be isolated
as my father used to say,protection son protection?
bobplum
Posts: 364
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2007 7:35 pm


Postby AndyB » Sat Oct 27, 2007 3:57 pm

No problem running copper pipe outside.If it was me I'd paint it afterwards to match rest of outside waste pipes
AndyB
Posts: 37
Joined: Sun May 20, 2007 7:46 pm


Postby tcno1 » Sun Oct 28, 2007 6:33 pm

[quote="AndyB"]No problem running copper pipe outside.If it was me I'd paint it afterwards to match rest of outside waste pipes[/quote]

But wont I have problems with them freezing?
tcno1
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:46 am


Postby tcno1 » Sun Oct 28, 2007 6:35 pm

[quote="bobplum"]yes but they would need to be insulated and preferably boxed in
fit isolating valves in side the house so in the event of problems the pipes can be isolated
as my father used to say,protection son protection?[/quote]

Will normal grey sponge insulation do, if so how thick?
tcno1
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:46 am


Postby bobplum » Mon Oct 29, 2007 8:31 pm

ideally you would be better laying the pipes underground using alkteme(i think thats how you spell it) but if the only real option is to run along the wall then yes grey insulation is advisable why not put two layers on
the reason for the isolating valves on the interior of the house is so you can turn off the water and drain the sytem to prevent burst in the cold or if they do burst you can quickly turn off the water
bobplum
Posts: 364
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2007 7:35 pm


Postby marrtin » Tue Oct 30, 2007 1:46 pm

Use plastic pipe rather than copper as it's less prone to frost damage. I would think twice about the hot supply though as for that length of run, the machine would be full before the hot water reached it.

Most modern machines these days only have a cold fill as they are considered more energy efficient. Check to see if your machine will work with just the cold connected. Many do.
marrtin
Posts: 374
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2007 6:42 pm


Postby richieplum » Wed Nov 07, 2007 10:07 pm

If you must run pipes externally ( that will carry water ), certainly do not use copper. It is prone to splitting when frozen. Alkathene ( black in colour ) is no longer available, the modern equivalent is medium density poly-ethylene (MDPE ) and is blue in colour. But this requires special fittings. The much better option is JG speedfit or an equivalent which is a direct match with the same size copper. e.g. 15mm copper, 15mm speedfit so the clips are the same as well. The only thing to remember is that the plastic comes with anti-crush liners. Once these are fitted carry on as normal and then lag the pipes to avoid freezing.
richieplum
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 8:32 pm


Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by


 


  • Related Topics