Full chimney breasts and stack removal or partial chimney breast removal and RSJs reinforcement?


Postby JS1 » Sun Dec 25, 2016 3:01 pm

I am going to renovate my house and am considering between removing the whole chimney breast and the stack on the roof or just on two floors and reinforce the 1st floor ceiling with RSJs. I have an edwardian house with a rear projection where there is a chimney that is shared with the neighbour. I want to convert my loft, which would be L-shapped, with a bathroom over part of the rear projection. The chimney can be fully removed if the neighbour agrees with the removal of the exterior stack, but if not, I can only remove on the ground and 1st floors, as the neighbour has already removed his on his ground and first floors. If I only remove the chimney breasts on the ground and first floors I will have to reinforce it with 2 RSJs, as per the structural engineer's drawings. Which of the two options would be more cost effective, considering the work involved? How much should each of the jobs cost (just for the removal, not including the plastering and painting, as that would have to be done anyway and scaffolding is already in place for the loft conversion)? Thank you very much, JS
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Postby welsh brickie » Mon Dec 26, 2016 10:12 am

its cheaper to remove the lot, structural calculations and inspection of the RSJs will have to be approved and inspected by the building inspector, Also removing the stack will eliminate any leaks from either the lead flashing or brickwork on the stack,in the future.
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Postby JS1 » Mon Dec 26, 2016 11:24 am

welsh brickie wrote:its cheaper to remove the lot, structural calculations and inspection of the RSJs will have to be approved and inspected by the building inspector, Also removing the stack will eliminate any leaks from either the lead flashing or brickwork on the stack,in the future.


Thank you very much welsh brickie. Is it cheaper because of the calculations and the inspections, or the workmanship and the materials required would also be cheaper (assuming it is a straight forward job)? Because we are in a conservation area, the loft conversion and the rear extension we are going to do require council approval, which is underway, and building inspection anyway, so no savings there. I agree that that would eliminate other problems in the future, so hopefully the neighbours will agree to it. If the workmanship and the materials are cheaper as well, it will be less of a financial burden, especially when offering to pay for the whole job to our neighbours in the hope they will be happy to agree with it.
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