Height restrictions on garden sheds


Postby Brisy » Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:51 pm

Hi. I am building a large shed in the bottom of the garden, well away from all the neighbours. The shed has a double pitched roof with a ridge height of 3.8M and eaves height of 2.4M. The shed is position in the corner of the plot with the gable end approx 3M from the boundary and the eaves/overhang side 1M from the boundary. Someone has made and "enquiry" with council planning who are coming to look tomorrow. There is confusion over whether the rules for permitted development allow the above on the basis that no part of the shed is above 2.5M within 2M of the boundary or whether I have to move the shed inwards by 1M (no mean feat as it is 5m x 6m!)

Any advice gratefully received, thanks
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Postby sparx » Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:40 pm

This should be asked on a building forum not this electrical one!
Although as a former planning town councillor I wonder why you didn't enquire yourself before embarking on such a large/expensive project...
Hoping no one would notice?
If planning permission is required try a 'retrospective application' as most get approved.
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Postby collectors » Fri Jan 22, 2010 4:16 pm

This used to be the rules in 2002

Neither Planning Permission or Building Regulation approval is required provided that:

* Sheds and greenhouses do not cover more than half of the area of the garden; not including the area occupied by the house.
* It contains no sleeping accommodation and the floor area does not
exceed 15 square metres.
* No point is less than one metre from a boundary.
* It is not more than 3m high for a flat roof, or 4m with a ridged roof.
* No part projects beyond any wall of the house that faces a road.
* The outbuilding is for use only by those who occupy the house.

Building Regulations do state that structures built of combustible material (i.e. a wooden shed) must be at least 2 metres from the main house.

NOTE: If being used for other purposes like an office or accommodation, it could be eligible for extra C/Tax & would need permission for change of use from the local pen pushers..
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Postby moggy1968 » Sat Jan 23, 2010 11:04 pm

would have to disagree with you Sparx on retrospective consents. most authorities take a very dim view of people chucking things up and then trying to present them with a fait accompli
there's every chance if you do this they will make you rip it down before even looking at your application
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Postby sparx » Mon Jan 25, 2010 9:00 pm

Moggy, it does vary with location but I do KNOW that in my area although they may get as far as issuing a notice to remove locally they don't have the cash to go to court over it if not complied with.
One of several reasons I 'jacked it in'.
Another case of unenforced rules leading to disquiet ie 'Part Pants'!
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Postby kbrownie » Mon Jan 25, 2010 9:07 pm

Surely this will come under permited developments, visit Direct.gov or call your local office up they will answer your question.
But being within 2 metres of boundarys the height will come in to question as will the materials it is being built in, plus the area you may have already built on and the percentage of the area you are going to take up.
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Postby collectors » Thu Jan 28, 2010 7:32 am

[b]Found the locals councils updated page for this sort of works.
Exempt building works January 2010[/b]

Exempt work are:

1. the extension of a building by the addition at ground level of:
a) a conservatory, porch, covered yard or covered way; or
b) a carport open on at least two sides;
where the floor area does not exceed 30 square metres, provided that in the case of a conservatory or porch which is wholly or partly glazed, the glazing satisfies the requirement of Building Regulation Part N Safety Glazing. An exempt conservatory must be separated from the remainder of the house by a wall, door or window.
2. A detached single storey building, having a floor area which does not exceed 30 square metres, which contains no sleeping accommodation and is a building:
a) at no point of which is less than one metre from the boundary of its curtilage; or
b) which is constructed substantially of non-combustible material.

These exemptions cover:

1. Detached garages having less than 30 square metres in floor area, and constructed of non-combustible materials.
2. Detached summer house having less than 30 square metres in floor area, and containing no sleeping accommodation and constructed of non-combustible materials.
3. Timber sheds are also exempt providing they are less than 30 square metres in floor area, and positioned a minimum of one metre from the boundary of its curtilage.[b][/b]
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