Kitchen fun

Postby markhar » Thu Jun 11, 2009 11:42 am

Hi all,

the wifey has opted for a new kitchen which means the layout is going to change somewhat. I'm fine with the plumbing aspects but want to check with you guys on the leccy bits of the change. Am I ok to re-use the cooker isolator? Its a switched type and currently connected to a stand alone. The new cooker/hob will be of the built in variety and obviously come as separate entities. This isolator also has a switched socket to it as well. Would I be better to go for a new cooker isolator? I also need to move a double socket point as its in the wrong place. I won't be adding a spur, just moving the cable a bit further along and dropping it down from the ceiling.

Am I ok to do both of these myself and then have them checked?

Also like to know how far leccy outlet points need to be from a sink a cooker to be safe.
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Simply Build It

Postby kbrownie » Thu Jun 11, 2009 7:00 pm

Kitchens come under part p of building regs. (take a look at project pages for part p)
So if you intended doing this yourself building controls need to be noitifed and they charge a fee, I know!
So it would be best to contact an electrician who is with the domestic installers scheme and likely in long run cheaper and defo safer!
But I will answer questions best I can: but take on board the above.
You should be able to use old isolator, but if your revamping kitchen, shiny and new my missus would insist!
First thing you really need to consider is the output of new cooker and if the current set up regarding cable size and fuse/mcb rating is suitable for the new appliance.
The cable for socket point you are moving must be in permitted zone, which means it runs directly vertical(150mm tolerance) in this case from new position of socket or have mechanical protection or buried at least 50mm in wall.
Socket outlets common sense applies as far as you can, the guidelines are at least 300mm.
If you know a registered electrician that is willing to supervise your work, ask them for advise and if they are willing to sign this work off as they will be taking a legal responsibillty on.
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