Kitching lighting.


Postby BML » Wed Nov 23, 2011 4:54 pm

After being in our bungalow for twelve years or so my dear wife has decided that we need lighting over the sink and work surface area. Old age is probably catching up with her. I have no idea what sort of wattage spot lights give or even what sort of lighting one uses in such places so I would welcome any suggestions other than, “buy her a torch.”
BML
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:11 am

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby ericmark » Wed Nov 23, 2011 10:01 pm

OK to start with most kitchens get too hot so lighting does not want to give out heat so forget any thoughts of tungsten lighting.

So two types left LED or Discharge [Florescent] the latter is also often called cold cathode. Much depends on design of the kitchen. 8 or 16 watt florescent fittings like used in caravans may fit well under wall units. The GU10 pods will fit in the ceiling directing light at selected areas. But first much be to look at the main light and there are a number of options.

Likely a florescent tube will be best for light and the HF type are quicker to start and last longer although more expensive. On the other hand the 2D units at 28W give out a far bit of light and look better.

I would not use extra low voltage as restricted to LED. Low voltage (230v) is better. For any spots GU10 type better as pods rather and sunk in ceiling but make sure they will take extra lenght of cold cathode lamps.

I don't say no to quartz halogen because of environment it's just the kitchen gets hot enough as it is without adding extra heat. This is main reason I use a induction hob keeps kitchen cooler.
ericmark
Posts: 1221
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:49 pm
Location: Mold, North Wales.


Postby ericmark » Wed Nov 23, 2011 10:11 pm

OK to start with most kitchens get too hot so lighting does not want to give out heat so forget any thoughts of tungsten lighting.

So two types left LED or Discharge [Florescent] the latter is also often called cold cathode. Much depends on design of the kitchen. 8 or 16 watt florescent fittings like used in caravans may fit well under wall units. The GU10 pods will fit in the ceiling directing light at selected areas. But first much be to look at the main light and there are a number of options.

Likely a florescent tube will be best for light and the HF type are quicker to start and last longer although more expensive. On the other hand the 2D units at 28W give out a far bit of light and look better.

I would not use extra low voltage as restricted to LED. Low voltage (230v) is better. For any spots GU10 type better as pods rather and sunk in ceiling but make sure they will take extra lenght of cold cathode lamps.

I don't say no to quartz halogen because of environment it's just the kitchen gets hot enough as it is without adding extra heat. This is main reason I use a induction hob keeps kitchen cooler.
ericmark
Posts: 1221
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:49 pm
Location: Mold, North Wales.


Postby BML » Thu Nov 24, 2011 8:38 pm

Many thanks. I will have to discuss it with the govenor.
BML
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:11 am


Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by


 


  • Related Topics