laminate floor under kitchen unit overhang


Postby john-plym » Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:42 am

I am thinking of putting B&Q "tile-loc" laminate floor in the kitchen. The boards lock along both the short and the long side.

I am concerned about 2 things:

(1) When laying the second row, locking board 1 into the first row is no problem as you only lock it in the long side. Board 2 seems a little tricky. You either:
(a) Lift board 1 to an angle of 30 deg (still in contact with row 1), then lock board 2 on the short edge with board 1 (coming in at an angle), then simultaneously lock the long edge of board 2 into row 1. All now locked in place. Repeat for board 3.
... or ....
(b) assemble the whole of row 2 in one go independent of row 1, locking on the short edges only. Then lift the whole row and insert it at 30 deg angle into row 1
... for a long room, both these methods seem problematic. Can you really lift and lock in place about 5 or 6 boards at once ???

(2) Some simple maths on my kitchen units says that I will not be able to fit these boards under the overhang at the bottom of the units. The bottom of my units have an overhang of 5cm from the plinth and are 15cm above the floor. The B&Q boards are 39.4cm wide. At some point in the kitchen I will be locking a board in place while under the overhang. The figures above say the board will be restricted to an angle of 22 deg, even less when I reduce the height with the underlay, which is much less than B&Q say is needed.
... so how on earth can you lock the tiles when you have restricted height ???

I laid a homebase laminate floor in a friends living room. It wasn't "splash proof", just a wooden effect. But it all went together like a dream. The boards were narrower (which helped in tight spaces), and you only locked at an angle on the long edge, then once the new board was flat on the floor you tapped it along so that it locked on the short edge with the existing board in the same row. Could not be easier.
... is there anything like this which could be used in a kitchen?

Sorry for waffling on, but the "experts" at these DIY shops only know whats on the leaflets and have not used these in anger. They must sell millions of these, so am I worrying about nothing ?
john-plym
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Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:00 am

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Postby stoneyboy » Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:38 pm

john-plym,
Suggest you use B&Q aqua-loc - designed for wetter rooms.
1a yes but get help
2 same as you last para lock the long side and tep into place.
end
stoneyboy
Posts: 2708
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 6:44 pm


Postby rosebery » Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:12 pm

"(b) assemble the whole of row 2 in one go independent of row 1, locking on the short edges only. Then lift the whole row and insert it at 30 deg angle into row 1"

Is the one.


"... for a long room, both these methods seem problematic. Can you really lift and lock in place about 5 or 6 boards at once ???"

No but using your tapping block and a hammer you will make it fit


"(2) Some simple maths on my kitchen units says that I will not be able to fit these boards under the overhang at the bottom of the units. The bottom of my units have an overhang of 5cm from the plinth and are 15cm above the floor."

Remove the plinths so that you can lay the edge of the laminate close to the feet. Fit the plinths back afterwards trimming if necessary so that they sit on top of the boards. Work out the right lengthways cut on the planks to make on BOTH sides so that when you reach the final row under the units it just fits. Rather than try and tilt the boards up on that final row lay them flat and using a pullbar or a strap clamp pull the joint together. Removing the plinth allows you to use either tool.

HTH

Cheers
rosebery
Posts: 2022
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2007 8:55 pm


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