Lap tiling between two bay windows


Postby koicarpus » Mon Jul 02, 2007 9:25 pm

Hi All,
could anyone give me some advice on lap tiling between my two bay windows.
At the moment my house is rendered, and I want to hack off the render between the two windows and tile it.
The house down the road has done it, and it looks really nice.
I'm a sparky, have a large selection of other skills, and have a reasonable idea of what to do!! ISH !!!
Your thoughts would be appreciated
Dave
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Postby thedoctor » Wed Jul 04, 2007 7:56 am

We think you probably mean plain tiles, ie 10 x 6 inch concrete tiles. If this is the case you can order them from a builders merchants in the colour you choose and at the same time get an intallation guide to fix them. Usually a breathable membrane is fixed to the wall with battens on which the tiles are hung and nailed. The tiling starts at the bottom with an eaves course for which the first batten is fixed (usually) at about 5.5 inches from where you want the bottom of the tiles to start. The next batten, for the first course of normal tiles is fixed just above the eaves batten so that the bottom of the tile is flush with the bottom of the eaves tile. Then the battens are fixed at 4 - 4.5 inch centres all the way up. The last course in another eaves course to cover the joint in th top two courses. Lead flashing usually hides the top row of nails.
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Postby Bus Godden » Wed Jul 04, 2007 9:40 am

What is behind the render?

Brickwork?

Or a timber studwork frame?

Bus
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Postby koicarpus » Wed Jul 04, 2007 5:24 pm

Sorry I thought it was called lap tiling!! (what's lap tiling?)
Thanks for your help so far.
Behind the render is stud work.
My bay is only round at one side, and my main concern is how I weather the side that is flat with the house. (hope that makes sense)
I think the tiles when finished, will protrude past the render. I think it's hard to tell until I start, but I think just pugging up the side won't be enough!!

Koicarpus
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Postby Bus Godden » Thu Jul 05, 2007 1:16 pm

There's 'double lap' tiling; for slates and relitively small componant tiles, and 'single lap' tiling; for often larger componant interlocking tiles such as Pantiles, Double Romans, Ludlows, etc.

Being as it's studwork that should makes things easier (saves plugging brickwork!).

You can close up (or adjust) the gauging given by The Doc to make the courses even out to suite a full/top course tile finish (eaves tiles should double up as a 'top course'). "Even the batten/lath gauging out", but better to squeeze rather than stretch!

You may have to chop the render back on the main house wall to fix lead 'soakers' in order to form a weatherproof abutment, otherwise contemplate a cement 'fillet' (sometimes acceptable on verticle work).
The other end you describe sounds like a normal 'verge' finish which should be left proud of the wall and neatly pointed in.

Bus
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Postby koicarpus » Thu Jul 05, 2007 9:46 pm

Thanks Bus, it's all becoming a bit clearer now!!

What do you mean by incorporating a "cement fillet" for the tiles that come round and finish square with the house wall?
I think I would prefer doing something different than having too much lead work.

Thanks for your help

Koicarpus
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Postby Bus Godden » Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:18 pm

Vertical tiling that abuts a plain wall is usual soakered and lead flashed, on good work. However, it can be 'close mitered', bedded and pointed in if the work is to be a little less meticulous (you will probably not get a perfect seal because of the action of incessant expansion and contraction).

That being said, on a 'rendered' wall, the render can be taken right up to and on to the tile abutment with a slight neat fillet to finish - again though, the never ending effects of expansion and contraction will have their effect where differing materials come together. Welted soakers (no need to 'flash') arranged under the render/fillet will make a more permanent job, but you may have to include a run of 'expanded metal' to key the render to to finish (leaving an 'expansion' gap).

There are a few factors to take into account:

How exposed is the bay to the elements ?

Is the abutment going to be a weak point prone to leakage if not done properly?

How permanent do you want the job to be?

Do you want/care to pay attention to detail?

Is it worth skimping?

What do you want it to look like?


I am not without some experience, but these are only 'my' personal views, if they help a little though and make your task clearer, I am content.

Bus
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Postby Bus Godden » Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:38 pm

Koicarpus!

I failed to mention - probably the most important detail . . . . . !!

"Do not forget to make sure that the overhang of your eaves/starter course does not interfere with the opening of any windows"!

Also, give the eaves a bit of a 'tilt' it makes for easier laying and gives a shape which is more pleasing to the eye (it also sheds rainwater away from the building/windows more effeciently) (not much is done in roofing without good reason!).

Bus
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Postby koicarpus » Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:06 pm

Thanks for all your help Bus,
I have decided to do a proper job!
Lead work on both sides, render over lead work to a stainless stop bead.
I'm going to be living here for a while. and I certainly don't want to be doing it again in the future.

Kind Regards

Koicarpus
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Postby koicarpus » Thu Jul 12, 2007 6:12 pm

Another question!!!!!!!
How the b....y hell do I curve the tile batton around the bay.
I've thought of wetting it, but I'm frightened of it splitting it when it dries.
I've also thought of cutting grooves out in the back of the batton, but will this create weak points, and just give it somewhere to split??

Help Gus

HELP!!!

Koicarpus
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Postby koicarpus » Thu Jul 12, 2007 6:13 pm

Sorry Bus, not Gus!!
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Postby Bus Godden » Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:47 pm

The only way I can suggest is to mitre joint and butt up at every vertical stud, if that makes it too sharp a profile then perhaps it would be an idea to insert extra vertical noggings.

Or fill in with vertical timbers completely in order to form a solid profile, in that case you would leave out the lath/battens - but then you would probably find it easier to de-nib every tile (a sharp tap 'down' from the head) and maybe use nails that are a little longer perhaps?

Bus (or Gus)
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Postby koicarpus » Tue Jul 17, 2007 6:31 pm

Hi Bus

Thanks for taking the time to reply.
I finished the job over the weekend,
and what i did was cut up 6 million strips of 4mm ply,
then glue and screw them around the bay. 4 layers made up to match the 19mm thick tile batton that i used on the flat front of the bay.
It was a sod to keep level, and took bloody ages, but it worked a treat!!!!
Job done, and it's kept the mrs happy.
Thanks again
Koicarpus
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Postby Bus Godden » Wed Jul 18, 2007 9:49 am

Lubbly Jubbly!
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