Mezzanine Bedroom


Postby skyman343 » Mon Nov 05, 2007 8:07 pm

Hello

Have recently moved into a new flat that has a mezzanine bedroom located above another bedroom in my flat. The mezzanine bedroom currently has single glazed windows which after many attempts at sealing let in a large percentage of noise from anyone downstairs. I am looking at greatly improving the soundproofing and am wondering which path to go down. ie: secondary glazing, window plugs etc.

I have attached a rough sketch showing the current layout to aid understanding of this particular arrangement.

I have considered adding an overhang to join onto downstairs roof to reduce some of the noise and would like any ideas on its effectivness bearing in mind that as it would not completley cover the whole area due to window limitaions, curtains etc.

Thank You any input is useful.

[URL=http://allyoucanupload.webshots.com/v/2005110978779703846][IMG]http://aycu01.webshots.com/image/30720/2005110978779703846_th.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

Hope this sketch works ok.
skyman343
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2007 7:38 pm

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby Nimrod » Sun Nov 18, 2007 4:39 pm

Skyman,

Great idea to provide a sketch of the problem. Most helpful. (And hats off to the moderator for publishing the url.)

A sketch is worth a thousand words.

I think you're correct when you write that the sound is getting into the room through the single glazing. It's also worth checking there isn't a pipe cupboard or similar connecting the upstair and downstair rooms.

Check for any leakage paths. In some ways sound is like water where even the smallest gap it will reduce the effectiveness of any sound reduction.

Assuming that there are no gaps in construction between the two rooms--intentional or otherwise (and if there are find a way to seal them)--then you should consider the secondary glazing route.

Click the button at the top of this page and look in the project area for information about sound proofing.

The canopy is an interesting idea but would raise a number of structural and safety issues. For these reasons and the difficulty in predicting the effectiveness I would suggest that you do waste time and money pursuing this idea further.

Let us know how you get on.

B:o)
Nimrod
Posts: 28
Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2007 7:01 pm


Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by


 


  • Related Topics