Moving Fused Connection Units From Loft to Cupboard


Postby Scott_Claire2010 » Sun Aug 21, 2016 3:22 pm

Hey guys,

I am new here but I need some advice, a few months ago I had 2 fused connection units installed in my loft for a home network I planned on installing, I now have to change my plan and install them in a nearby cupboard which at the moment had no power I was wondering am I allowed to move the fused connection units from the loft into the cupboard myself or should I get an electrician to do the job. I should also mention this work is not in a special location.

Advise would be appreciated.

Scott
Scott_Claire2010
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
50%
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2016 3:12 pm

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby kbrownie » Mon Aug 22, 2016 4:23 pm

You are allowed to, providing you follow the requirements of part p of the building regulations and the guidance within BS7671:2008 (amd3 2015)
Without knowing exactly what you are going to do, with regards of rerouting cable and cable safe zones and any additional protection that maybe required, as far as buried cable is concerned. It would be very difficult to advise any further. I would suggest that this would be a job for someone who has a knowledge of the relevant regulations.
kbrownie
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 1958
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:36 pm

Postby Scott_Claire2010 » Mon Aug 22, 2016 6:08 pm

Thank you for your reply. The cables will be placed in trunking along the wall. They are wired to a old Emerson heater switch which in turn is wired to a MCB in consumer unit.

Thanks for your help.
Scott_Claire2010
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
50%
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2016 3:12 pm

Postby kbrownie » Tue Aug 23, 2016 7:49 am

If the cables are to remain in containment throughout there route and not entering a special location, then RCD protection will very likely not be required, unless there are socket outlet connected to the FCUs.
You still need to follow part p, which requires electrical installations to be undertaken safely and that the installation is safe to use.
So my question to you, would be.
How would you do this?
I ask that question not in disrespect but not only must use the correctly rated cable to carry the current safely, there are also a number of tests required to prove a circuit is safe to use and this would require some calibrated electrical test equipment to do this.
kbrownie
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 1958
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:36 pm

Postby Scott_Claire2010 » Tue Aug 23, 2016 7:57 am

I understand where you are coming from, all I would be doing is re-routing the 2.5mm supply cable that is currently going into the loft back out of the loft the same way it enters (as it is only pushed through a hole in the plasterboard) and re-wiring it to the fuse spurs in exactly the same way the electrician installed them. I had this job done only in May this year but now plans have changed.

Thanks Scott
Scott_Claire2010
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
50%
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2016 3:12 pm

Postby kbrownie » Tue Aug 23, 2016 4:06 pm

You still need to prove the following, if you are making any type of alteration, although considered minor.
* continuity of all conductors
* Insulation resistance is compliant
* Polarity is correct
* Zs is at a permitted value
* And if RCDs are in circuit, that they are within the permitted tripping times

You may think the job is very minor, but it is so easy to make a simple mistake! Which could lead to a very dangerous outcome! Electrics is not plug-in and play!
kbrownie
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 1958
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:36 pm

Postby ericmark » Wed Aug 24, 2016 9:29 am

It is nearly impossible for a DIY person to follow the regulations to the letter. In the main due to the test equipment price, and no DIY guy would want to pay out. However that does not mean DIY is banned or you can't do it with reasonable safety.

The problem comes when anyone asked "Can I" as if we answer to the letter of the regulations the likely answer is "no". But if you select the correct cable, and allow for any heat, in other words use some common sense likely there will be no problem.

Regulations and law are not the same. The law (Part P) is poorly written and in the main needs court cases to be fought to clarify what it means, since very few court cases are fought with DIY people there is not likely to be clarification for a very long time. In the main it has to be that bad some one is killed before there is a court case.

Those working for others are not so lucky, do something in a house to be rented out, and you are likely to be taken to court far more than doing same thing in an owner occupied house.

The law varies, Scotland, England and Wales are all different. In Wales where I live some items are listed as not requiring notification, in England it is the other way around, some items are listed as requiring notification. But all comes under Part P, it states in Wales you should follow BS7671:2001 in England it states BS7671:2008 which will likely mean the installation complies, but you could follow German regulations at the moment, but scheme member electricians can't follow German regulations they must follow BS7671:2008 amendment 3 as they have a contract with the scheme provider.
ericmark
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 1783
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:49 pm
Location: Mold, North Wales.

Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by



  • DIY How to Project Guides

  • DIY how to tutorial projects and guides - Did you know we have a DIY Projects section? Well, if no, then we certainly do! Within this area of our site have literally hundreds of how-to guides and tutorials that cover a huge range of home improvement tasks. Each page also comes with pictures and a video to make completing those jobs even easier!



 


  • Related Topics