Open fire or Log burner


Postby bb700 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 6:36 pm

Just moved into our home (built 1900`s) it has an Edwardian open fireplace which I intend to use for occasional use during the Winter months. The chimney is in superb original condition ; weather proof with no internal `leakage` of smoke etc. (not lined). Do I opt for Logburner or open fireplace; I want the choice that will be the best for the chimney & structure ,not interested in room heat so much . I`ve been told that the exhaust from the logburner will be too cool for the top of the chimney & that the warm air will condense against the cold stone causing possible dampness. Could this be a problem , I will burn logs for only 6-8 weeks max. during Winter months.
Open fire or Logburner?
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Postby Asbestos Surveyors » Fri Apr 30, 2010 2:23 pm

bb700 wrote:Just moved into our home (built 1900`s) it has an Edwardian open fireplace which I intend to use for occasional use during the Winter months. The chimney is in superb original condition ; weather proof with no internal `leakage` of smoke etc. (not lined). Do I opt for Logburner or open fireplace; I want the choice that will be the best for the chimney & structure ,not interested in room heat so much . I`ve been told that the exhaust from the logburner will be too cool for the top of the chimney & that the warm air will condense against the cold stone causing possible dampness. Could this be a problem , I will burn logs for only 6-8 weeks max. during Winter months.
Open fire or Logburner?


I would say open fireplace. I've never had any problems with this. Where did you hear about the possible logburner problems?

Rob
Asbestos Surveyors
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Postby bb700 » Fri Apr 30, 2010 6:04 pm

Asbestos Surveyors wrote:
bb700 wrote:Just moved into our home (built 1900`s) it has an Edwardian open fireplace which I intend to use for occasional use during the Winter months. The chimney is in superb original condition ; weather proof with no internal `leakage` of smoke etc. (not lined). Do I opt for Logburner or open fireplace; I want the choice that will be the best for the chimney & structure ,not interested in room heat so much . I`ve been told that the exhaust from the logburner will be too cool for the top of the chimney & that the warm air will condense against the cold stone causing possible dampness. Could this be a problem , I will burn logs for only 6-8 weeks max. during Winter months.
Open fire or Logburner?


I would say open fireplace. I've never had any problems with this. Where did you hear about the possible logburner problems?

Rob

A fireplace website stated that a logburner gives 80% room heat with 20% exhaust heat ; an open fireplace gives 20% room heat with 80% exhaust heat . Because of the reduced heat entering chimney with a logburner the stonework at the top of the chimney may still be cold resulting in possible condensation when warm air hits it. I haven`t proved this but open to any comments or help ; Thanks Rob
bb700
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Joined: Tue Apr 27, 2010 8:35 pm


Postby Perry525 » Sun May 02, 2010 5:50 pm

To work properly a fire needs to have a chimney that is more then 17foot six inches from the highest entry point of the fire opening to the top of the chimney.

Depending on its type and output it also needs a specific size flue.

It requires a fire that is big and hot enough to lift the cold air that is inside the chimney, pull air to burn from the room via the requisite sized air vent, to avoid down drafts.

A fire also needs an air source, that conforms with the size of fire.

If there is no easy air source and the fire is not hot enough to lift the smoke up and out of the chimney, then at times of high pressure the fire will deliver smoke into the room.

When there is a strong wind, the passing wind will create an area of low pressure to the lee of the building, which can draw air and smoke down the chimney.
From the above its important to get the size, output and type of fire right.
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Postby nottssimon » Fri Dec 10, 2010 3:12 pm

/quote]
A fireplace website stated that a logburner gives 80% room heat with 20% exhaust heat ; an open fireplace gives 20% room heat with 80% exhaust heat . Because of the reduced heat entering chimney with a logburner the stonework at the top of the chimney may still be cold resulting in possible condensation when warm air hits it. I haven`t proved this but open to any comments or help ; Thanks Rob[/quote]

I personally would have selected a log burner: those percentages just seem to confirm that they are more efficient, in my opinion.
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Postby alexa1 » Wed May 18, 2011 12:40 pm

I love I would say open fireplace so I'd I say open fireplace
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Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 12:32 pm


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