Outside placement of electrics


Postby Pglen » Thu Jun 19, 2008 4:42 pm

I am having a hydrotherapy pool installed and for safety would prefer that the electrics are installed outside of the room in which it will sit. My ideal location is to place them (ie heater, filter and pump unit) in a secure weatherproof box outside the house and have it connected to the consumer unit via appropriate cabling. (The position I have in mind is on the other side of the wall to where the consumer unit is sited, so easy to get to CU).

Is this allowed in principle (would there be any specific requirements for the housing which will need to be about 4ft x 4ft), would a regular part p qualified leccy be able to install.

thanks

Pete
Pglen
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2008 4:33 pm

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby BLAKEY1963 » Thu Jun 19, 2008 10:26 pm

[quote="Pglen"]I am having a hydrotherapy pool installed and for safety would prefer that the electrics are installed outside of the room in which it will sit. My ideal location is to place them (ie heater, filter and pump unit) in a secure weatherproof box outside the house and have it connected to the consumer unit via appropriate cabling. (The position I have in mind is on the other side of the wall to where the consumer unit is sited, so easy to get to CU).

Is this allowed in principle (would there be any specific requirements for the housing which will need to be about 4ft x 4ft), would a regular part p qualified leccy be able to install.

thanks

Pete[/quote]

PGLEN
Your part p electrician will be able to help you with this project.
get him in now to give u a quotation for work required.

BLAKEY1963
Last edited by BLAKEY1963 on Fri Jun 20, 2008 8:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
BLAKEY1963
Posts: 654
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 10:57 pm


Postby ericmark » Fri Jun 20, 2008 7:44 am

I see no reason why your suggestion should not be possible so long as some form of heating is included to stop freezing. As to a Domestic Electrician (Part P) being able to do the work again I can see no problems as far as he is concerned it is just a matter of connecting up in accordance to manufactures instructions and British regulations. As to specialist (Non Part P) doing the work he would need providing with a supply as if he creates the new circuit from the consumer unit he would need Part P. A swimming pool comes under different regulations to room with bath or shower and does not require Part P to do work in the area. I am sure that is an over sight on the writers of Part P but maybe they expect it to be specialist work! Where you may get a problem with a standard domestic electrician is if something is faulty and he may not have the skills required. I wonder what the manufactures say about commissioning often it needs commissioning by one of their agents even if all connected up by a domestic electrician.
I would recommend you reading the instructions. And these questions should also be directed to manufacture who is in a far better position to answer them.
Yours Eric
ericmark


Postby Pglen » Fri Jun 20, 2008 10:19 am

Thanks for the reply Eric - but now you have me worried. I'm happy that I can get someone to do (and more importantly certify, it's a conversion and building regs are involved) the outside electrics which is probably quite straightforward but what worries me now is the earthing in the room.

From what I understand, if all conductive parts are bonded to the distributor earth there is still the possibility of shock because true earth (eg wet person in contact with floor) may not be at same potential as distributor earth. One way round this may be to create a separate earth for the pool room. Buidling regs do not seem too fussed and if it's not covered by part p then I would be concerned that I could get someone in who may not be aware of all the issues. What would be the safest solution?

thanks

Pete
Pglen
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2008 4:33 pm


Postby ericmark » Fri Jun 20, 2008 3:03 pm

I have looked at the regulations 702.411.3.3 and 415.2 and there does not seem any mention of earthing systems. And providing all extraneous-conductive-parts are connected by supplementary protective bonding conductors to the protective conductors of exposed-conductive-parts of equipment situated in these zones, in accordance with Regulation 415.2 remembering this will include the main metallic reinforcement of constructional reinforced concrete if any. Fig 705 of BS 7671:2008 shows a cut away plan of a cattle shed and how that should be earthed it will be similar with swimming pools. But where no reinforced concrete is used the fabric of the building is quite a good insulator and like the bird landing on an electric wire even if the whole building is 230 volt above the voltage at the end of your garden it will not matter so long as all the house is the same. Since I did not mention earthing before why have you become worried is it something in the manufactures instructions. A separate earth is out of the question this would be dangerous even a joining houses are required to have the same earth this is why the supply authority has to select what system is used not the electrician. This is really a question for the engineer on site not to engineers or electricians remote to the job who may very well be missing vital facts. It is too easy to miss something. I would have thought there would have been reference to all that is required in the manufactures instructions?
Yours Eric
ericmark


Postby BLAKEY1963 » Fri Jun 20, 2008 8:49 pm

[quote="Pglen"]Thanks for the reply Eric - but now you have me worried. I'm happy that I can get someone to do (and more importantly certify, it's a conversion and building regs are involved) the outside electrics which is probably quite straightforward but what worries me now is the earthing in the room.

From what I understand, if all conductive parts are bonded to the distributor earth there is still the possibility of shock because true earth (eg wet person in contact with floor) may not be at same potential as distributor earth. One way round this may be to create a separate earth for the pool room. Buidling regs do not seem too fussed and if it's not covered by part p then I would be concerned that I could get someone in who may not be aware of all the issues. What would be the safest solution?

PETE
When u have enlisted your part p electrcian , issues like earthing
can be looked at , after establishing the method of earthing at the
property , and checking with supply authority what method you
have .
Before installing and at the design stage, your electrcian will fully
inspect manufactuers information and will contact direct to double
check installation proceedures , and enquire or clarify speacilist
engineers required to commission equipment in line with any
manufactuers warrentys.
finally when your electrician is ready for the installation stage in
line with your requirements , then being part p registered , the
competent persons scheme he is with , will have a
technical helpline he can ring to clarify , installation method ,
manufactuers instructions and compliance with current BS7671
WIRING REGULATIONS.
IN your case for example questions on earthing can be addressed
with your electrcians helpline , manufactuer , and the electrcian
himself , to achieve complete clarity on any issues before installing.
My technical help line at NICEIC , are very helpful , ensuring
that on completion as part of thier membership agreement, they
will issue thier own warrenty to the customer , guarenteeing
the work thier registered electrician has carried out for a
defined period..
i wish u every sucess with your project and hope u find a part p
registered electrcian to help u with this

BLAKEY1963.
BLAKEY1963
Posts: 654
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 10:57 pm


Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by


 


  • Related Topics

cron