Outside socket and lights


Postby robster281 » Tue Sep 09, 2008 11:17 am

Hey guys, I know this has probably been done to death but just wanted to make sure what id being considered is right or wrong?

Installing an outside single socket by breaking into the ring then into a single socket then a second single socket then re-wiring back to the original socket so as to avoid the outside sockets being a spurs and avoid any junction boxes etc , circuit is RCD protected and supplies 4 double sockets and a fcu all in the kitchen. Is this okay?

I then want to take a supply from one of the single sockets to an outside switch(next to socket) powering some outside lights. Would this be suitable? The outside lights transfromer are in a sealed external box under my decking (12volt).

Further to that a supply taken from the other socket via armoured cable to the garage (40ft ish away) to a socket/light. There will be hardly any load in the garage just the hoover, drill charger or power washer at best.

Cheers in advance!
Bob
Last edited by robster281 on Tue Sep 09, 2008 9:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby ericmark » Tue Sep 09, 2008 3:53 pm

Most the work you are doing will come under Part P and as such it must of course be right of the Local authority building control will reject it.
The adding of a socket to a ring main seems straight forward enough if you go to IET web site and look for 17th Edition you will find the is a correction this gives all the ways to take power from a ring main.
Any fixed wiring will still come under Part P even if you plug it in. So since all work either kitchen or outside it will all be Part P.
Sealed boxes are often worse than those with drain holes each time they heat and cool they tend to draw in water.
40 ft is quite a long distance and volt drop will need calculating. Also earthing will need considering again IET website and look for “Wiring Matters” this is a magazine they publish and there is an arterial on out building wiring.
It is hard to visualise what exactly you are doing but I think you will have problems with inspection and testing and step one is follow links in projects and down load the Part P document I think about page 22 it shows a sample of the paper work you will be required to fill in. If you can either understand or nearly understand what it is asking for then we can help but if it is as clear as mud then better to get some one in to do the work.
I will help you but first I want you to understand what you have to do rather than getting half way and getting stuck.
Eric
ericmark

Postby robster281 » Tue Sep 09, 2008 5:19 pm

Cheers for the response. Basically the socket in the question in the kitchen but has enough cable once chased up the wall a little to go through the cavity and therefore to the 2x single sockets on the wall outside. This will then be returned to the socket inside single to complete the ring main. Thus the sockets are not spurs from the ring main but infact part of it.

And then as before, a switch and further possible supply to the garage.

Regards
Bob
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Postby ericmark » Tue Sep 09, 2008 11:29 pm

The fitting of the socket seems OK. But you must consider Part P. If you are doing a far bit of electrical work it can be worth while going through building control but depending on area one is looking at £70 which will go a long way to paying an electrician who is registered and can self cert for doing the job.
On top of that is the hire of the meters to complete the inspection and testing plus the chance of getting it wrong.
Without seeing a job I recommend 6mm SWA cable for outdoors. As this is likely to comply with all earthing and volt drop requirements. Since I don’t know what type of supply you have can’t really recommend smaller cable even if only using 16 amp.
Again an electrician on site will likely use a smaller cable where he is sure earthing etc does not require the larger cable.
Electricians are like everyone else and offering to do of the work for him so reducing costs is often accepted but he can’t sign for work he is not responsible for.
With the solicitors now asking for the paper work with house sales and insurance also often becoming void if not followed I would advise you do comply with Part P.
Eric
ericmark

Postby robster281 » Wed Sep 10, 2008 9:04 am

My idea was to mount the sockets etc leaving all connections and trucking/channeling and waterproof boxes loose/not connected so that it could all be inspected and final connections made by electrician.

So if i went with your recommendations of 6mm SWA, would you advise a small CU in the garage or is this not needed as the house ring is protected by a RCA anyway?, am I best to stick with the IP56 rated junction box?

Regards
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Postby ericmark » Thu Sep 11, 2008 12:35 am

You need to talk to the electrician who is going to inspect and test. He may recommend less than me and save you money. He is signing it's his call.
Also IET web site has an article on out building in their wiring matters. See http://www2.theiet.org/Publish/WireRegs ... tdoors.pdf Eric
ericmark

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