Parkray 401 replacement


Postby coldnfedup » Sat Jan 05, 2008 9:44 pm

Hi

Does anyone know of a suitable boiler to replace an aging Parkray 401?

We need it to fit in the same position as the parkray and be fueled by gas.

We need it to supply hot water and 6 medium sized radiators and room heating when the radiators are not on

Help would be appreciated
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Postby htg engineer » Sat Jan 05, 2008 10:11 pm

is there a reason why it must fit in the same position as the parkwray ?

It is law that boiler must be condensing boilers, so that can decide on where it would/could be installed.

A combi boiler would be more cost effective and would do, what you want.
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Postby coldnfedup » Sat Jan 05, 2008 10:52 pm

[quote="htg engineer"]is there a reason why it must fit in the same position as the parkwray ?

It is law that boiler must be condensing boilers, so that can decide on where it would/could be installed.

A combi boiler would be more cost effective and would do, what you want.[/quote]

Thanks for the quick reply

The existing Parkray is in the lounge and we will need a similar radiant heat facility. We want the minimum of upheaval. The only gas point in the house is under the Parkray and all the heating pipes and cylinder are in the room behind.

You quote [i]"It is law that boiler must be condensing boilers"[/i] . Who's law? and what does it mean by "condensing boilers"?
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Postby htg engineer » Sun Jan 06, 2008 10:36 am

The government and Building regualtions state that High Efficiency Boilers (condensing) only from April 2005.

Is the existing gas pipe for the gas poker ? if so then it's probably only 15mm and would have to be upgraded, depending on how far it is away from the gas meter - but probably have to be upgraded to 22mm.

Conventional boilers lose a substantial amount of heat with the products of combustion. This heat is virtually wasted. The Condensing Boiler incorporates an extra heat exchanger so that the hot exhaust gases give up much of their energy to pre-heat the water in the boiler system. When working correctly, much of the water vapour produced in the combustion process condenses back into liquid form releasing its latent heat.

There will be occasions when it is too difficult or too expensive to install a condensing boiler - these are known as exceptions situations. A procedure has been developed by Government and industry so that installers can assess whether an installation is an exception situation.

Hope this helps
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Postby globus » Thu Mar 20, 2008 5:37 pm

I too have a Parkray 401. We recently had our meter replaced and the Engineer advised that we really should think about having the Parkray replaced – something we had been thinking about ourselves for some time. We are concerned about two things:- (a) the cost and (b) the upheaval. Setting aside the cost here are the facts.

Our Wimpey home has concrete floors. Our Parkray is also fitted in the lounge in the fireplace area with a back boiler. It supplies the hot water system and eight original (1974 vintage) radiators. There is just the two of us and we use the electric shower most of the time with only the occasional bath. From the previous comments it appears we must fit a condensing boiler when we come to replace it.

Having the gas fire in the sitting room is great for getting some instant warmth into the room. Having a back boiler in the sitting room can be quite noisy. However, as the gas / water / electric are already there it makes sense for the new boiler to be fitted there. Having no knowledge of their capabilities is it possible to fit a condensing boiler behind a gas fire in the fireplace?

If this is not possible we would be thinking of having the condensing boiler fitted in the kitchen somewhere. We have the plumbing for the gas but how much upheaval would there be in plumbing in the hot and cold water pipes for the new boiler?

And lastly the radiators are not very effective. I suspect this is due to them being ‘slugged up’. Would we be better fitting new radiators or flushing out the old ones when we fit the new Boiler?

Sorry the above is akin to ‘How long is a piece of string?’ but the beauty of this site is receiving impartial advice without people trying to sell me something. I can then go and ponder the options and have at least half an idea when we come to replace the Parkray. It will also stop me wasting the Company / Engineers time with stupid questions.
:oops:
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Postby htg engineer » Thu Mar 20, 2008 9:41 pm

I think a Combi boiler would suit your needs, as you have said you use an electric shower, so why heat a large tank of water for washing dishes etc etc ?

A combi will cope with the 8 radiators easily, will fill a bath, and you have the option of fitting a thermostatic shower.

As for the siting of the boiler, the pipes needed are:

Flow
Return
Gas already in kitchen
Cold Water Inlet already in kitchen
Hot water outlet already in kitchen
Pressure relief through outside wall
Condensate discharge to drain (kitchen)

I would guess the kitchen would be the best and easiest place to install a combi.

The flow and return can be located anywhere, depending on if you're wanting to re-pipe (recommended for age of pipework) or use existing pipework ?
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Postby globus » Thu Mar 20, 2008 10:46 pm

Many thanks for your swift reply.
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