part p


Postby charlie58 » Fri Jun 13, 2008 1:01 pm

At what point does electrical work need to be part p certified? If i was to add a new socket on a ring main would that require certification? similarly if i was to add a ceiling rose and switch to an existing circuit does THAT need certification?

Thanks in advance for your responses.
charlie58
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Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 9:55 pm

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Postby ericmark » Fri Jun 13, 2008 6:59 pm

Unless in a kitchen or bathroom neither of the examples you have mentioned need Part P. It is required for a new circuit from consumer unit, for consumer unit change, Any changes or additions to Kitchen or Bathroom and work outside not attached to the main building. There is a link to Part P in projects section also to changes with new 17th Edition which comes into force 1st July 2008. One should complete installation or minor works certs for any electrical work but it does not have to be submitted to the LABC. Remember any work on a circuit means you are responsible for that circuit and should inspect and test not only your own work but any work done before. It is the problem of being responsible for whole circuit complying with the regulations which has raised prices of most electrical work where the electrician spend more time inspecting and testing than doing the job.

All best Eric
ericmark


Postby charlie58 » Mon Jun 16, 2008 1:59 pm

[quote="ericmark"]Unless in a kitchen or bathroom neither of the examples you have mentioned need Part P. It is required for a new circuit from consumer unit, for consumer unit change, Any changes or additions to Kitchen or Bathroom and work outside not attached to the main building. There is a link to Part P in projects section also to changes with new 17th Edition which comes into force 1st July 2008. One should complete installation or minor works certs for any electrical work but it does not have to be submitted to the LABC. Remember any work on a circuit means you are responsible for that circuit and should inspect and test not only your own work but any work done before. It is the problem of being responsible for whole circuit complying with the regulations which has raised prices of most electrical work where the electrician spend more time inspecting and testing than doing the job.

Thanks for that Eric.......could you clarify what you mean by "installation or minor works certs" Does this apply to diy'ers, what are these certificates and where does the "none professional" joe obtain them from.


All best Eric[/quote]
charlie58
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 9:55 pm


Postby ericmark » Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:22 pm

Not allowed to give links but google (BS 7671:2008 forms) and select (Forms for electrical contractors - The IET) and you should find the new 17th Edition forms on offer in PDF format as free down-load. You will also find old 16th Edition forms as part of the Part P document there is a link in projects section but these have On-Line Version printed across them.
Every change to an installation should have paperwork raised to show what has been done and the all the tests have been carried out.
In the main it is a memory jogging exercise which ensures you don’t miss doing the basic safety checks. The main problem with any electrical work is not the work its self but how it interacts with what is already there.
Typical example is if a plastic switch was changed for a metal one then checking the earth wire is connected at its origin is as important as connecting it at the switch.
The problem arises in the expensive equipment required the low ohm meter should draw 200ma and the high ohm meter should test using 500 volt so a multi-meter would not fit the bill but of course anything is better than nothing and many of the tests are visual and well worth doing for general safety.
In theory the forms are required to be filled in by both trade and DIY alike but the only time you are likely to have to produce them is at a house sale or insurance claim.
Also in theory every 10 years or on change of ownership a “Periodic Inspection Reportâ€
ericmark


Postby charlie58 » Tue Jun 17, 2008 8:40 am

[quote="ericmark"]Not allowed to give links but google (BS 7671:2008 forms) and select (Forms for electrical contractors - The IET) and you should find the new 17th Edition forms on offer in PDF format as free down-load. You will also find old 16th Edition forms as part of the Part P document there is a link in projects section but these have On-Line Version printed across them.
Every change to an installation should have paperwork raised to show what has been done and the all the tests have been carried out.
In the main it is a memory jogging exercise which ensures you don’t miss doing the basic safety checks. The main problem with any electrical work is not the work its self but how it interacts with what is already there.
Typical example is if a plastic switch was changed for a metal one then checking the earth wire is connected at its origin is as important as connecting it at the switch.
The problem arises in the expensive equipment required the low ohm meter should draw 200ma and the high ohm meter should test using 500 volt so a multi-meter would not fit the bill but of course anything is better than nothing and many of the tests are visual and well worth doing for general safety.
In theory the forms are required to be filled in by both trade and DIY alike but the only time you are likely to have to produce them is at a house sale or insurance claim.
Also in theory every 10 years or on change of ownership a “Periodic Inspection Reportâ€
charlie58
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 9:55 pm


Postby ericmark » Tue Jun 17, 2008 11:35 pm

As to Part P basically whats done is done, but as to general safety getting an electrician to do a PIR would I am sure put your mind at rest. It will not get you completion certificates though. Odd as it may seem it is not anything to do with Part P and the electrician who completes it will not need to be registered. There is not even a qualification that he needs to hold but most people consider a City & Guilds 2391 should be held. Unfortunately many firms see the PIR as a money making exercise and skimp on the job. As to how you can ensure the guy you employ does a good job I don't know. I would hope he finds very little wrong but my son tells me he has never done a PIR without finding faults. They should be done every 10 years or on change of occupant which ever is the sooner.
All best Eric
ericmark


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