Re: FIXING PREVIOUS OWNERS BODGE - Need help, pics included


Postby ALEXANDER RICHARDS » Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:32 am

Hi guys,

have recently moved into house and after finishing up work on the ground floor have now moved my efforts to the loft!

Had been told by previous owners that it had been converted and was ready to be inhabited! LIES!

The new floor has been cobbled together from offcuts of timber and I need to sort it out. When I lifted the three layers of 6mm MDF that were being used as a floor I discovered that there had been new joists laid at 90degress to the existing.

The old joists run along and sit on-top of the internal masonry leaf and rest in the external leaf. they are about 2 x 3 inches. What I would like to know is why are these new joists running in the opposite direction and is there anyway I can beef up the existing to make a proper floor.

Pictures on link.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alex_richards/5330029908/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alex_richards/5329417355/

Thanks in advance

ALEX
ALEXANDER RICHARDS
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Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:12 am

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Postby stoneyboy » Fri Jan 07, 2011 5:49 pm

ALEXANDER RICHARDS,
"What I would like to know is why are these new joists running in the opposite direction" - Makes dealing with services eg electric and water a lot easier.
"is there anyway I can beef up the existing to make a proper floor." Yes by adding deeper timbers but you will need to ensure there is proper support.
end
stoneyboy
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Postby ALEXANDER RICHARDS » Sat Jan 08, 2011 11:21 am

Thanks for your reply stoneyboy.

I hadn't realised that the secondary joists could be to avoid services!

Is there a rough rule of thumb that I can use to work out how big timber needs to be to support a floor and whether the existing is suitable?

Alex
ALEXANDER RICHARDS
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:12 am


Postby stoneyboy » Sun Jan 09, 2011 11:25 pm

ALEXANDER RICHARDS,
If you can support either end it used to be take the span in feet, halve it and add 1", nowdays its far more complicated and if you get BR involved structural calculations will be needed.
end
stoneyboy
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Postby ALEXANDER RICHARDS » Mon Jan 10, 2011 9:53 am

Thanks again for your reply.

Slightly confused about what I can and can't span onto. Other areas of the roof have been converted in the past etc etc. If I were to give B.R's a ring, would they come out and give advice? And...would I want this advice or as it is all a bit dodgy at the moment would they just tell me to rip it all up?

Being as my bedroom is on this floor, i do not want to find that I have some enforcement order to start all over again up there!


Alex
ALEXANDER RICHARDS
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:12 am


Postby stoneyboy » Mon Jan 10, 2011 11:16 pm

ALEXANDER RICHARDS,
Very doubtful that anyone from BR dept would be willing to either come out or give you advice.
Your new joists need to be supported on load-bearing walls.
I suggest you get a structural engineer to have a look. Your local BR may be able to suggest someone to contact.
end
stoneyboy
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Postby andy01 » Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:54 pm

get hold of the building regs 'approved document part A' 1992 not the current version 2004, but the one before - prob get one in a library if the internet fails to come through

look towards the back and you will find span tables

heres a link

Google "planningportal.gov.uk/uploads/br/BR_PDF_AD_A_1992.pdf"

up to date tables are also avaible to buy from trada

having not seen the whole loft i would say its looks errm unusual and may not be up to the job of a habitable room.

have you have been miss sold a product? is there a way to reclaim money from the previous owner?
andy01
Posts: 68
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 7:18 pm


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