Replacing a power shower


Postby Locum » Thu May 10, 2007 10:20 am

I want to replace my existing power shower (installed in 1999) with the current version of the same model from the same manufacturer. No changes are required to the plumbing, but the manufacturer recommends that I replace the exisiting electrical transformer with the one that comes with the new shower. This will require hard wiring the mains cable from the transformer to the exisiting mains switch (in place of the mains cable from the old transformer).

Is this work that falls within Building Regulations (i.e. requires a Part P certified electrician to carry out/inspect the work)?
Locum
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 10:06 am

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby sparx » Thu May 10, 2007 7:25 pm

Not in my opinion as you're only changing like for like 'accessory', is transformer in room with shower or in adjacent cupboard, presume transformer comes with mains flex to go to local isolator?
More info. please, regards SPARX
sparx
Posts: 2166
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:33 pm
Location: The fifth continent.


Postby Locum » Thu May 10, 2007 9:04 pm

Thanks for responding Sparx. More information:

The transformer is in the floor to ceiling (one metre wide and 0.6 metres deep) airing cupboard situated between the bath/shower and the WC. It is located at the back of the upper compartment of the cupboard which has separate doors and can only be reached with a step ladder or equivalent. The shower unit is affixed to the tiled partition between the cupboard and the bath (the partition effectively forming the side elevation of the cupboard) and is at a lower level than the transformer.

The existing transformer (rated 230 volt, 50 Hz) has a black mains flex and a white appliance flex (as does the proposed replacement, which is rated 230V, 0.63Amp, 50Hz). The mains flex is affixed to the bathroom wall forming the back of the cupboard and runs down to the fused isolater, while the appliance flex runs down the back wall and then a little way along and through the partition straight into the back of the shower unit. The shower isolator is a switched and fused (3 amp fuse) box affixed to the back wall of the cupboard at about eye level and immediately above (and cabled from or through) the central heating control unit isolator.

My concern is that the regs governing bathrooms may now preclude any form of electrical work, even like for like accessory replacement, without Building Regs approval or Part P certification.
Locum
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 10:06 am


Postby sparx » Fri May 11, 2007 5:01 pm

The set up 'as-is' meets regs. if top cupboard only accessable "by use of a tool", which may be a door key!
I don't think that replacing like for like was ever meant to be an issue with Part P, from my early meeting with 2 Jags ministerial technical adviser, he said intention was to prevent unqualified people carrying out dangerous installation work. As your install. presumably done right by leckie first time then you would not be reducing safety if you copy.
REGARDS SPARX
sparx
Posts: 2166
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:33 pm
Location: The fifth continent.


Postby Locum » Fri May 11, 2007 5:36 pm

Thanks, Sparx, much obliged for your time.

Regards, Locum
Locum
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 10:06 am


Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by


 


  • Related Topics