Securing lath & plaster ceiling from above?


Postby Gypsy07 » Thu Oct 07, 2010 10:55 am

Can anyone please advise me on how best to secure a slightly loose lath & plaster ceiling from above?

It's a two storey flat (top & attic) in an 1890's building and due to extensive renovations the upstairs is in a fairly shell-like state. I've lifted all the floors, so have great access to the other side of the downstairs ceilings, some of which are badly cracked and slightly loose. None of them are anywhere near collapsing but in places they HAVE separated from the lath strips and it's making me nervous thinnking what a disaster it would be if they were to get any worse...

What's the best way to make them slightly more secure while I've got the chance and the open access from above?

I was thinking maybe a 50/50 PVA & water mix - sprayed on as any kind of actual contact no matter how gentle seems to dislodge more bits and pieces. And then expanding foam to secure the plaster back to the lath strips.

Any comments/suggestions/cries of OMG DON'T DO THAT would be welcome.

Cheers :-)
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Postby 30yearsinthegame » Thu Oct 07, 2010 7:03 pm

hi

there is only 1 answer , take it down and replace with new lath and plaster or plasterboard.

why would you want to repair a mess? you could just cut out the area which needs it and replace with board.

hope this helps
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Postby Gypsy07 » Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:07 am

30yearsinthegame wrote:hi

there is only 1 answer , take it down and replace with new lath and plaster or plasterboard.

why would you want to repair a mess? you could just cut out the area which needs it and replace with board.

hope this helps


Um, thanks for the opinion, but there's no way I'm taking any of it down till it actually starts to fall down in chunks, which like I said is nowhere near happening yet. Firstly, the ceilings look fine from the rooms below. So it isn't a mess, it's just become unsecured in places. Secondly, there's a lot of fancy cornicing, plaster mouldings and a huge ceiling rose in each room, all of which is original. Unless it becomes absolutely neccessary, I'm not removing any of it.

I'm just looking for ideas for securing it from above. This must be a common problem in older buildings, so surely there are a few standard techniques for dealing with it...
Gypsy07
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Postby 30yearsinthegame » Sat Oct 09, 2010 6:21 pm

The only way to secure it temp is to put battons over the ceiling screwing it into the joists. Your right this is a common thing , most people replace the ceiling or over board, but hey whaty do I know!

Replace your ceiling , how can any one advise different. Or just keep it like it is!
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Postby welsh brickie » Sun Oct 10, 2010 10:31 am

I would have to agree with 30yearsinthegame,but If you dont want to do that try using pva on the loose areas and mix drywall adhesive to hold the ceiling in place.It bonds well to virtually anything.
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Postby jillofalltrades » Fri Sep 23, 2011 2:44 pm

If your ceilings or walls (plaster) are cracked or loose from the lathe (if u can't tell visually - prees on either side of the crack - if it noticeably moves) the keys ( globs of plaster which once secured your plaster to the lathe) are broken ... I use plaster washers (not the plastic ones ) little thin metal humped washers that flatten out when you drill them into the surrounding plaster (but you have to catch lathe if not they will spin around or not flatten out) ... if you have to sometimes it is necessary to make a circular etched out area, for the washer so that it is slightly below it's surrounding plaster , so that when you skim coat with 20 or 45 Easy Sand there is no slight bump ... I get mine locally ... but there is a place I used to get them (on the east coast " St. -Something - will try to find the name and post it again later ... there is also a new product - "Big Wally's plaster magic " that is excellent ... but pricey ... but great for first timers .... later when or if you become proficient at this you can use OSI glue and plastic washers to do the same thing ... hope this helps ...
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