Sticking Shower Switch - What Keeps Causing This?


Postby russellfl » Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:22 pm

Hi, can anyone advise?

I have had problems with my shower ceiling 45a switch. Sometimes I can pull it on/off though I have to give it a very strong pull but other times it sticks until I give it a good whack with an hair brush, though now it's given up the goat completely. This is the second one I've changed, the first one was exactly the same. I don't want to get another one unless I have to. Any ideas?

Cheers
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Postby proptech » Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:50 pm

Hi
Sounds to me like you are using rubbish switches, go for a decent make like MK or Crabtree. Having said that, for the sake of safety, it may be wise to have the shower circuit tested by a qualified electrician.
Anything other than a whack with a hair brush.
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Postby ericmark » Sat Mar 15, 2014 10:04 am

Isolators are designed to be operated off load switches are designed to switch on load. Although many isolators can be used as switches that does not mean all can be used as switches. Also they are not designed for constant use.

The Isolator on my consumer unit has likely been switched off in 25 years no more then 100 times but my light switches have likely had 1000's of operations.

Table 53.2 in the wiring regulations lists the BS, BS EN, and IEC numbers of devices for Functional switching, Emergency Switching and Isolation. However we rarely check the numbers we tend to see what it looks like and just stick it in. I am sure if used for isolation then the pull cord unit would be OK maybe used 5 times a year but if every time you have a shower it is operated then really one should use a switch that will isolate rather than an isolator that will switch.

In the main the pull cord isolators are used to comply with regulations as cheaply as one can if it was intended to be used daily then we would fit a wall mounted isolator.

As already said you can likely buy a better quality one aim for well known makes like MK but isolators in the main are not designed for daily use.
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Postby proptech » Sat Mar 15, 2014 7:40 pm

With due respect to ericmark's post, the user's instructions for most showers advise that the isolator is switched off when the shower is not in use. As the isolator is not switching on load, there is no reason why a reliable manufacturers product should not be up to the job.
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Postby ericmark » Sat Mar 15, 2014 9:17 pm

I did check google shower instructions got Triton showers so read that and it states: is appliance is intended to be permanently connected to the fixed wiring of the electrical mains system.

It also says: Switch off when not in use but states it is a general instruction for all electrical appliances and clearly contradicts the first instruction. It is rather a bad instruction as with items like cookers switching them off would disable the cooling fans.

Yes when the house in not in use during holidays one would turn off cooker, TV, Video recorder, sky box, immersion heater, and shower. But is states it is designed to be permanently connected once you start switching it off it's no longer permanently connected.

Also the instructions I found were out dated 6mm twin and earth in conduit it says 38A but my book says 32A so one wonders who writes these instructions like the bathroom fan instructions saying use 3A fuse where we all know winding will burn out well before the fuse seems some one has a check list and adds things to the instructions after with not real point.
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Postby proptech » Sun Mar 16, 2014 7:38 pm

You are quite right there is a contradiction in the instructions. I'm sure I've read the same in just about every shower I've installed. Perhaps the OP should give the manufacturers a ring, and ask their technical department the reason why they suggest this.
I'd be interested to hear their comments. I could be wrong, but, like you, I see no reason for isolation every time.
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Postby ericmark » Wed Mar 19, 2014 8:02 pm

It has been pointed out Ceiling pull switch. BS EN 60669. Is not able to be used as an isolator even though that's normally why they are fitted. I have tried in vain to find a locking bracket for either pull switch or cooker switch the latter can be used as isolator but would guess must be visible.
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