Temporary protection of dry rot?


Postby SimonFJ » Sat Mar 21, 2009 7:12 pm

I have recently moved into a property with dry rot in the basement and in one area of the property previously used as a shop. This problem was identified during the purchase process and the scale of the problem has been preliminarily assessed. Prior to any working starting to rectify the problem (which includes making the basement habitable), I am wondering what would be the best thing to do with the area affected.

The dry rot is in the floorboards and joists and has unfortunately spread to some of the masonry. Most of this is protected by tongue and groove wood panelling, a small area of which was removed for the initial assessment to be done.

The shop wasn't used for around ten years and the basement, previously a bakery, ceased to be functional over twenty years ago so neither has been properly heated for a long time. The property is built into a hillside so the natural moisture and the resulting damp/cold appears to be the cause.

I am wondering whether to remove all this panelling to allow the room to 'breathe' and heat up, especially during the warmer weather or whether it is best to keep the problem behind the wood panelling to stop the spores spreading. I am concerned that it will spread to the upper floors which shown currently no sign of infection.

I am also considering installing a couple of radiators, one in the shop and one in the basement, at least o increase the general temperature prior to work starting.

Any suggestions welcome.

Thanks.
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Postby welsh brickie » Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:04 am

with dry rot there is no temporary solution you have to remove all the infected timber plus at least 1 metre cleared around the infected area.
Also clean all your tools after your done as it will spead to other parts
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Postby SimonFJ » Sun Mar 22, 2009 3:11 pm

[quote="welsh brickie"]with dry rot there is no temporary solution you have to remove all the infected timber plus at least 1 metre cleared around the infected area.
Also clean all your tools after your done as it will spead to other parts[/quote]

Thanks. I am aware of the work that needs to be done and that there is no temporary solution, however the company won't start for another 3-4 months so I was wondering whether in the meantime it is best to expose the masonry and timber or leave it covered behind the tongue and groove boards.
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