Thermostatic shower and pump


Postby bluenun » Tue Jul 29, 2008 5:51 pm

I live in a bungalow and am having a Thermostatic shower fitted next week.

The Plumber did point out that the water might not come out at much pressure and it may need a pump fitted up in the loft as there is no room in the airing cupboard or underneath the bath.

So we have decided to install the shower and see how it works.

If the pressure is poor and I need to have a pump installed upsatairs in the loft, what type and how much should one cost?

I would like to know so I can get a rough idea of how much they cost before he comes round.
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Postby chris_on_tour2002 » Wed Jul 30, 2008 10:48 am

there are hundreds of pumps out there, you would probably be wanting a 3 bar pump but always check the spec of the shower. with regard to cost, you can pay as little as £80 up to £500 depending on quality and functions. your plumber is best positioned to advise. then you have installation cost on top - impossible to say how much that will cost without seeing what's involved. there may be long runs of pipe in areas with tricky access etc all things which will bump up the cost

you could go to your local plumbers merchant with details of the shower (or the place you bought the shower) and seek their advice regarding the right choice of pump. but if you trust your plumber then follow his advice.
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Postby bluenun » Thu Jul 31, 2008 8:19 am

Thanks for the reply. As always is is not as straight forward as I had hoped :)

The technical data in the booklet that came with the shower says.

Operating pressure.
Max: 5 bar
Min: 0.5 bar
Recommended: 3 bar. (so it looks like you are right)

I have recently moved to this area and have never used this plumber before so I do not know if I can trust him yet.
He was trying to sell me a second hand shower head and riser for more that I bought a new one but that does not mean he is a bad guy.

He suggested a pump would cost me about £400 + labour.
I just wanted to see if that was about right or not.

As for functions of the pump, what functions are there besiades pumping water?

The access into the bungalow loft is good with easy access to the pipes.
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Postby chris_on_tour2002 » Fri Aug 01, 2008 7:52 am

ask your plumber for the exact make and model of the pump that he intends to fit then do your own research for prices to see if he is charging over the odds. easily done on-line.

expect to pay a mark up of 10%-20% if your plumber sources it - although it's possible he can get it at a trade price so might actually be cheaper than you could buy it.

expect to pay around £200 for fitting if its reasonably straightforward.

with regard to the pump itself, some pumps have adjustable pressure settings so you can fine tune to suit your system - not strictly necessary but could be a useful function. most are now automatic and self-activating and will kick in as soon as there is a demand. some are manual. then there's good old fashioned quality. the more you pay the better the model and quality so the longer it will last and more reliable it will be. provided of course that it has been installed properly.
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Postby bluenun » Fri Aug 01, 2008 10:21 am

I will see the Plumber next Tuesday an will ask which pump he intended installing but find tradesmen are often not forthcoming with information usually.

I did some searching online but do not think I am able to post links, am I?

A whole range of pumps for different needs.

One site has a Pump Comparison Guide with information like, pipe size, stalled pressure, motor rating, variable speed, and usage.

I only need it for one thermostatic shower, is that classed as a single shower with one outlet or multi outlets?

£200 for the plumbers installation fee and it will also require an Electrician too.
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Postby chris_on_tour2002 » Wed Aug 06, 2008 5:06 pm

you will need a twin impeller pump for hot and cold. single shower only unless you plan on running other appliances from it.

£200 sounds reasonable. expect to pay a further £150 for the electrician. make sure he gives you a part p certificate for the work.
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