thermostatic shower flow


Postby arthur b » Wed Mar 05, 2008 6:17 pm

any ideas- I have very poor flow to showerhead, temperature is fine.
Cold water tank & vented hot cylinder are in loft.
I don't really want to fit pump unless no other choice, would a York flange with a pipe running just to shower from the hot water cylinder & 22 mm pipe running from cold water tank to shower make much of a difference in flow.
any thoughts gratefully received.
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Postby Kenj » Fri Mar 07, 2008 10:34 am

If your pipework to the shower is currently run in 15mm, then changing this to 22mm may make a difference.
However, the problem is more likely due to the siting of your cold water tank and the hot water cylinder. There should be a mimimum 5 foot head of water to achieve an adequate flow rate. This means the bottom of the cold water tank should be 5 feet above the top of the hot water cylinder. This is not easy to achive in a loft, without putting the CW tank high up on stilts.
The best option is to resite the H/W cylinder on the floor below.
I had to do this in the first house that I bought after the previuos owner decided to rip out the airing cupboard and put the H/W tank in the loft.
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Postby rosebery » Sat Mar 08, 2008 3:30 pm

You have a static head problem between the water level in the CW storage tank and the shower head. This will not change significantly if you carry out all the expensive plumbing alterations suggested.

Your cheapest, simplest solution is to pump it frankly and be far less hassle.

And yes you should have a separate supply for the shower from the hot water cylinder:

An E s s e x flange fits into the side of the cylinder.

Surrey and Yorkshire flanges fit into the top - the difference between them being whether the tank has a male or female coupling.

Cheers
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Postby arthur b » Mon Mar 10, 2008 7:22 pm

pipe is already 22mm and I live in a bungalow so looks like the pump might be the best option. I have an SP60 single impeller pump 1.8 bar, could I use this to run the bath,basin & shower or would this not be possible.

Thanks to kenj & rosebery for the good ( very welcome) advice.
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Postby chris_on_tour2002 » Mon Mar 10, 2008 10:50 pm

quote: "The best option is to resite the H/W cylinder on the floor below."

this wouldn't actually work too well if the hot water has to be pushed back upstairs from the tank on the ground floor then up even further to the shower head.

as rosebery suggested, a pump is the easiest answer.
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Postby rosebery » Tue Mar 11, 2008 7:59 am

SP60 is a single ended version of TP60. You need equal pressure/flow from both hot and cold feeds otherwise the shower won't work properly. Therefore you need to pump both hot and cold feeds and a dual pump is best for that.

The CWS tank needs to be of sufficient size to be able to deliver the water volume needed for showering.

If you are not sure about this I'd recommend getting some people in to look, advise and perhaps quote to see precisely what your situation demands. Then you can decide if it's within your competance or not. Bear in mind that a bathroom is a special location under Part P of building regs if the pump has to go in there. I suspect you can put it in the roof though.

Pleased to be have been able to be of some help.

Cheers
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Postby Kenj » Tue Mar 11, 2008 11:13 pm

kenj "The best option is to resite the H/W cylinder on the floor below."

chris_on-tour2002 says
"this wouldn't actually work too well if the hot water has to be pushed back upstairs from the tank on the ground floor then up even further to the shower head."
-------------------------------------
This is precisely the way most 2 storey houses have been plumbed for many decdades. A cold water tank in the loft, and a hotwater cylinder in the first floor airing cupboard, usually in the bathroom. My own house is plumbed like this and I get quite a reasonable water flow in the shower.

I know that Arthur lives in a bungalow, but there is no difference to my 2 storey house in this instance, as my shower and hot cylinder are both on the first floor. The water does not have to be pushed all the way back upstairs. It only needs to pushed as high as the shower head.
Last edited by Kenj on Thu Mar 13, 2008 5:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby arthur b » Wed Mar 12, 2008 6:47 pm

I've decided to go with the dual flow pump and would like to say thanks to all for taking the time to help. I now have a much better understanding of how to get this sorted.

Cheers
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