Toilet won't stop filling!


Postby Yully6 » Wed Apr 30, 2008 3:20 pm

I recently switched from a cold water tank to mains pressure in my bathroom. This in turn left me needing a new float etc to be put into my toilet cistern. It worked at first but now, following the flush, it is refilling and doesn't seem to recognise when to stop and just keeps filling. I have a push button cistern with an internal overflow so the excess water then goes down the back of the toilet.
Is there something I can adjust to correct this problem? I have had a little fiddle by pushing the float up and down but to no avail!
Thanks
Yully6
Rank: Apprentice
Progress to next rank:
0%
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 3:14 pm

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby rosebery » Thu May 01, 2008 10:56 am

Just pushing it up and down won't help.

There will be a screw device (knurled top to hand adjust or with a sot for a screwdriver) to allow you to vary the height of the float. Normally if you turn it clockwise it will descend and anti-clockwise it will rise. Edit - the other way round clockwise to go down, anti clock to come up - sorry.

Try adjusting that (downwards) so that the water stops coming in when it reaches about 1 inch below the overflow outlet.

If that doesn't work you may have a problem within the valve itself. There will probably be a small flap valve inside. Sometimes these aren't very good. Easy to replace but if you haven't had it that long and it's been doing it since installation get onto the supplier and bleat. They'll probably send you a new one. Sadly this is not a not uncommon with these - particularly if it wasn't that expensive.

Let us know how you get on.

Cheers
Last edited by rosebery on Thu May 01, 2008 9:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
rosebery
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 2022
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2007 8:55 pm

Postby stevenc1603 » Thu May 01, 2008 3:07 pm

Did the new valve you bought come fitted with a high pressure orifice?

If its come fitted with a low pressure one then the valve hole will be too big and will never close with the force of the incoming water.
stevenc1603
Rank: Ganger
Progress to next rank:
99.3%
Posts: 199
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 11:59 am

Postby rosebery » Thu May 01, 2008 9:56 pm

Check the float first.

Cheers
rosebery
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 2022
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2007 8:55 pm

Postby Yully6 » Thu May 01, 2008 10:40 pm

I can't seem to turn the knurled knob either way?! Its stuck fast!

I've taken a photo of my tank in case that helps......?!
http://www1.snapfish.com/share/p=699112 ... /otsi=SALB

Next step is to call back the plumber who fitted it but worried it'll cost me loads when all that needs to be done is something simple!

Thanks for your help (-:
Yully6
Rank: Apprentice
Progress to next rank:
0%
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 3:14 pm

Postby rosebery » Fri May 02, 2008 10:49 am

Pic is always worth a thousand words. Yes they can be a bit of a b to adjust because you are probably frightened of breaking it. It should turn though.

I can see the float is well submerged but that the water level is also quite a bit below the level of the overflow. This doesn't add up to the float letting too much water in and points more towards the valve itself.

But now you've introduced an additional factor:

"The plumber that fitted it"

How long ago did he fit it and has it been like this since he did fit it?

If very recent and is as fitted you should have no reason to worry about a high charge because he should come back and fix it on your request at no cost to you if he has fitted a faulty valve or has fitted it badly.

The next step will be dependent on your answer.

Cheers
rosebery
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 2022
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2007 8:55 pm

Postby chris_on_tour2002 » Fri May 02, 2008 3:27 pm

that little vertical thing that looks like a flagpole is what you need to turn. clockwise and the float will descend thereby raising the arm and shutting the water off earlier. sometimes they are stiff. a gentle twist with a pair of pliers can help, if not it is often easier to pull it out of its clip (carefully) then reclip it lower down.

if that doesn't cure the problem then, as stevenc says its the valve. they are usually the diaphragm type (small disc shaped piece of rubber), change for a high pressure one, you can buy them at any plumbers merchant. to get to it unscrew anit-clockwise that blue o-shaped lockring at the top of the mechanism (not the one lower down). MAKE SURE THE WATER IS OFF FIRST! otherwise you will get a soaking. take the old one with you. last time i bought one it cost me 90p.
chris_on_tour2002
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 1024
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2007 9:14 pm

Postby bobplum » Sat May 03, 2008 6:05 pm

hi
i would replace the inlet valve
when you do look up inside and look for a flow restrictor,looks like a long screw this is designed to slow the mains pressure so it doesnt damage the internal workings,if its not there then this probarly caused damage to the internals
make sure its in the new one
bob
bobplum
Rank: Foreman
Progress to next rank:
54.7%
Posts: 364
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2007 7:35 pm

Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by



  • DIY How to Project Guides

  • DIY how to tutorial projects and guides - Did you know we have a DIY Projects section? Well, if no, then we certainly do! Within this area of our site have literally hundreds of how-to guides and tutorials that cover a huge range of home improvement tasks. Each page also comes with pictures and a video to make completing those jobs even easier!



 


  • Related Topics