total rewire


Postby MALPASS » Fri Jul 09, 2010 10:02 pm

question for the experts, i am considering bying a house which has had all the electrics robed out , it is disconected from the mains supply , i have in the past done all my rewiring needs and then had them inspected or checked, with the constant changes in regulations if i were to rewire, would the check from the electricity supplier be enough as if they are not happy they wont reconect ? would i have to inform the building inspector ? what are my options to keep everyone happy and not for it to cost me a fortune ? I can do the instalation but not test afterwards. constructive advise would be apreciated
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Postby ericmark » Sun Jul 11, 2010 5:20 am

You would need to notify the LABC before you start and pay their fee. Rules have changed and now they can charge for any third party people they employ so they can charge you if they test.

There are versions of the installation certificate with three signatures one for designer, one for installer, and one for tester. However since inspection and testing is on going this does not really help.

Really if you can't inspect and test you should not do the job but even large firms do employ electricians to do work and inspectors to sign it off and the main point is the inspector controls what the electrician does.

So if you can get an electrician to control the job it could work. He will tell you what to do and at what point he wants to inspect next. In theory the LABC should do that but in practice they don't and the big problem is they only issue a completion certificate not an installation certificate.

The rules are complex. The building regulations are split into parts and P controls electrics but also bits of M, J and L also come in and socket heights, ventilation, and heating all effect how the house is wired.

New regulations have also brought new considerations for example the use of Ali-tube cable. By using Ali-tube lights except for bathroom do not need RCD protection and also special sockets for fridge etc do not need RCD protection. However since you normally have to buy it by the role one has to consider if worth the cost? Silly rules like separating lighting and heating can really catch one out. Seems use of a tungsten bulb to heat and light a room is now not allowed.

And a new regulation book is due by next year so even more changes.

Speed is a problem and although in theory it is the regulation in force when the system is designed that counts in practice electricians don't keep old editions and work to current so if your too slow it can cause a problem getting items signed off.
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Postby MALPASS » Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:00 pm

thank you ericmark , not sure i am any the wiser , lots to get ones head around , not like the old days, I was hoping the electric supplyer would check before they turned the supply back on and that would be good enough, i asumed they would not reconect if it wasnt to standard ?
MALPASS
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Joined: Fri Jun 11, 2010 8:15 pm


Postby ericmark » Wed Jul 14, 2010 11:31 am

The tests are now done by Local authority building control who in turn are allowed to sub-contract and charge for the work. The fees depend on the cost of work but start at a job worth £2000 so at least £100 plus vat more likely you will pay £300 to council it varies county to county.

However the LABC only issue a completion certificate not an installation certificate and often the supply authority want to see the installation certificate before they will connect. The only person who can complete an installation certificate is person doing the work. So if DIY that's you.

It needs reading entered which require expensive test equipment. And if a TT supply until supply is connected a very special test instrument to test the earth.

The norm is to install an isolator (Not part of consumer unit) then a consumer unit and a double socket and get the supply authority to give you a supply so you can use power tools while doing the work. You can then test and make live each circuit as completed. However the LABC is responsible for site safety and they have to be satisfied you have the skill required.

For a complete re-wire you may be required to follow building regulations as to socket heights etc too although unlikely but you need to know before you start. Best is to submit detailed plans then once accepted they can't change their minds.
ericmark
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:49 pm
Location: Mold, North Wales.


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