Treating Damp Behind Kitchen Unit in Semi-Basement


Postby Di Ai Wei » Sun Dec 01, 2013 9:52 pm

I have a kitchen unit with cupboards and drawers which is fixed to an external wall, and the kitchen is in a semi-basement, so the top of the unit is just below the pavement outside. (It’s at the end of a terrace.) Not very surprisingly there is damp behind the unit, which is causing mould in the cupboards and drawers. Either side of the unit there are tiles, and no damp or mould is evident there; behind the unit is plastered brick. I am wondering what to do about this damp problem. One possibility might be to remove the unit, hack away plaster, instal a damp-proof membrane or apply a damp-proof paint (which?), then replaster. I wonder if it might also be worth fixing with plugs going into brick a rigid sheet of something like pvc (to prevent the membrane or paint possibly being loosened eventually by damp) before reinstating the unit, but I’m not sure how worthwhile this would be. I’m also not sure if it’s worth removing and replacing plaster rather than just applying the membrane or paint to the existing plaster. Obviously a limited treatment like this would leave damp elsewhere behind the tiles, but it’s the kitchen unit which is the urgent problem, and I’m certainly not going to remove all the tiles. Any ideas?
Di Ai Wei
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Postby welsh brickie » Mon Dec 02, 2013 3:45 pm

install an airbrick through the wall behind the unit so that air can circulate and dry out the damp
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Postby Di Ai Wei » Mon Dec 02, 2013 4:33 pm

The thing is, even the top of the unit corresponds to a level outside which would be underground...
Di Ai Wei
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Postby welsh brickie » Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:42 pm

you can install a periscope air vent that will allow the air to access the back of the units, available at www.screwfix.com
telescopic underfloor vent

Product Code: 12025
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Postby Di Ai Wei » Wed Dec 04, 2013 12:55 pm

Interesting, having seen those before - but it seems to me it would mean removing a number of bricks in a majorly load bearing wall, which I wouldn't be keen to do...
Di Ai Wei
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:30 pm


Postby welsh brickie » Wed Dec 04, 2013 8:58 pm

you will not be altering the structural integrity of the building by removing a few bricks to install an airbrick, if in doubt seek professional advice before installation
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Posts: 1972
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