Types of Cordless Drills


Postby May » Mon Mar 19, 2007 10:39 am

I am a female who does a lot of D.I.Y. Presently use a fairly old Black and Decker Drill. Would like to buy myself a new cordless drill which will drill holes, and screw, screws straight into walls, wood and concrete etc.

Would appreciate any advice on which type of Cordless Drill is the best and easiest to use.

Many thanks
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Postby thedoctor » Mon Mar 19, 2007 7:46 pm

You wont get a lot better than this for a cordless drill May.

http://www.awin1.com/pclick.php?p=86682 ... 071&m=1228

This will drill holes in most things but to drill through brickwork and concrete it might be better to use your old B&D.Good cordless drills with a hammer action powerful enough to drill through brick and concrete are a few hundred pounds as the batteries have to be so strong. You can buy them cheaper but they do not last very long. The one we have linked to is an all purpose drill/driver that will stand you in good stead and last for as long as you need it.
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Postby May » Tue Mar 20, 2007 9:51 am

Hello,

Just to say a big thankyou for the advice I have received to my two posts. They have been extremely helpful.

Many thanks

May
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Postby andy190906 » Thu Aug 02, 2007 3:22 pm

Hi,

I've just tried the link in the above post and it only takes me as far as the screw-fix home page. Is it possible to identify the drill suggested?

I'm currently on the market for a drill and, like May, am after something cordless that i can use for most jobs (inc drilling in to masonry).

I've been unsure whether to buy a combi-drill or to buy a good quality handy drill (i.e. a 12V for around the house jobs) and also buying a corded hammer drill for jobs that require a little extra umph. Would this be worthwhile as opposed to compromising with a cordless combi-drill (which appear expensive and quite large)?

Many thanks,

Andy
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Postby htg engineer » Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:57 pm

quite expensive but I think most decent cordless drills are but i'd recommend Makita, brilliant 24v cordless drills.
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Postby gwoppa » Tue Nov 13, 2007 8:52 pm

[quote="thedoctor"]You wont get a lot better than this for a cordless drill May.

http://www.awin1.com/pclick.php?p=86682 ... 071&m=1228

This will drill holes in most things but to drill through brickwork and concrete it might be better to use your old B&D.Good cordless drills with a hammer action powerful enough to drill through brick and concrete are a few hundred pounds as the batteries have to be so strong. You can buy them cheaper but they do not last very long. The one we have linked to is an all purpose drill/driver that will stand you in good stead and last for as long as you need it.[/quote]

Hi there!

What was this drill?

The link's dead.

I also find myself in need of a decent cordless drill, preferably cheaper than a Makita 24V...

Ta
gwoppa
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Postby thedoctor » Tue Nov 13, 2007 10:37 pm

Sorry about the link, I will check it out in the morning and publish the new one as soon as possible
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Postby marrtin » Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:29 pm

Really, the problem with cordless drills is how much do you want to spend.

You can find them anywhere from £20 to £350! Personally, I prefer Bosch and Dewalt as I have over the years found these to be reliable and do what they are supposed to.

I use 3 voltages. 12volts - will happily build loads of kitchen units etc. 14.4 volts for light drilling rawlplugs etc, and 24 volts for seriously heavy masonry drilling. I keep the voltages down otherwise I find the drills become too large or heavy to use satisfactorily.

Of course, the money goes on the batteries. NiCad are found in cheaper drills and have the dreaded memory effect, so have to be charged carefully. NiMH are higher power and can be charged at any time but are more expensive.

Cordless power tools need using. Batteries left for long periods without being exercised fully will fail very quickly.

These are similar to two of the drills I have used for the last 4 years:-

www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id=71981&ts=95477

www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp;js ... 3&ts=96485
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Postby thedoctor » Thu Nov 15, 2007 1:17 pm

Sorry for the problem with the link, this product has been discontinued.

Please try the link below
http://www.awin1.com/pclick.php?p=14400 ... 071&m=1228
thedoctor
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Postby Jim357 » Tue Jan 08, 2008 8:53 pm

hi there.
i have used JCB 18v cordless drills for the last 4 years.. and i have done over 40 kitchen fits..and 30 bathrooms. and everything else besides..
2 batts.
1 hour charge..
hammer action..
16 tourqe settings.. + drilling
quick chuck..
case..
light ish..easy to use.. and it really is a kick of a mule. i swear by them.
for around 30 - 45 pounds.
if you look around.
hope this helps.
jim
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Postby bobplum » Wed Jan 23, 2008 7:07 pm

got to be dewalt/makita followed by boche
id have 14v for everyday use and 24 for the heavy stuff
keep a mains drill for heavy brick work
bob
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Postby geffers123 » Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:34 pm

i have always found aldi a good place to buy diy equipment their products are as good as anyone elses. plus you get a 3 x year warranty on all electrical goods
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Postby MrDrill » Tue Oct 13, 2009 1:09 am

To drill into concrete you really need a hammer drill, and I think one of the better hammer drills for women or anyone that wants a light-weight drill is the Makita BHP452HW.

It only weighs about 3.5 lbs, about 1/3rd less than the average hammer drill, but still delivers about 450 in-lbs of torque. It's rated highly by users.

The Hitachi DV14DL is another good option but it costs a lot more.
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Postby justint » Fri Oct 23, 2009 1:47 am

I second the suggestion for a hammer drill for concrete. But I think you should check out the new V28 line from Milwaukee. It is a little bit heavier at 6.7lbs, but you get extra power for that weight. I'd be a little skeptical of a hammer drill that's too light.
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Postby deidrea8 » Wed Mar 03, 2010 3:01 pm

I think that the (Google "ingersollrandproducts.com/IS/category_nolinks.aspx-am_en-21016] IQv") series is extremely reliable and gives an impressive amount of power with a great battery life. Comparable to Makita in my own opinion.
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