Why is my Kitchen so Cold in 1900 Stone Wall House with Extension


Postby Mavs801 » Tue Feb 16, 2016 11:32 pm

I have a 1900ish stone wall house, with an extension added on the back is around 1970, with the kitchen downstairs, and bathroom upstairs.

The house belonged to my grandfather, and we also thought he had a cold kitchen and condensation build up, but would just open the window and it would clear. While my grandad was still in the house, the house was in a regeneration area and has had external insulation and has been rerendered. My grandfather passed away and I bought the house, there were no issues with damp identified, and all the walls have been replastered and the house completely redone.

Whilst my bathroom can be a little nippy, my kitchen feels like I'm walking outside, it is Baltic. I expected it to be cool as there's no room for a radiator, but it's really quite cold. I am confused as I thought the external insulation would act like a big hug around the extension? And why is the kitchen colder than the bathroom (I understand that heat rises, but there's none to start with) could I be losing 'heat' through the double glazed window? It is about 15years old??

Sorry for my complete lack of knowledge!! I think it is just a breezeblock structure, with a concrete floor? But there's no vent in there? Could that help or hinder?

If someone could point me in the right direction in laymans/women's terms, it would really help!
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Postby Bauwer » Fri Dec 02, 2016 9:50 am

Mavs801 wrote:I have a 1900ish stone wall house, with an extension added on the back is around 1970, with the kitchen downstairs, and bathroom upstairs.

The house belonged to my grandfather, and we also thought he had a cold kitchen and condensation build up, but would just open the window and it would clear. While my grandad was still in the house, the house was in a regeneration area and has had external insulation and has been rerendered. My grandfather passed away and I bought the house, there were no issues with damp identified, and all the walls have been replastered and the house completely redone.

Whilst my bathroom can be a little nippy, my kitchen feels like I'm walking outside, it is Baltic. I expected it to be cool as there's no room for a radiator, but it's really quite cold. I am confused as I thought the external insulation would act like a big hug around the extension? And why is the kitchen colder than the bathroom (I understand that heat rises, but there's none to start with) could I be losing 'heat' through the double glazed window? It is about 15years old??

Sorry for my complete lack of knowledge!! I think it is just a breezeblock structure, with a concrete floor? But there's no vent in there? Could that help or hinder?

If someone could point me in the right direction in laymans/women's terms, it would really help!


Hi Mate,
Does your extension wall have a cavity in it?

Regards, Alexander
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Postby Mavs801 » Fri Dec 02, 2016 5:45 pm

Thanks for reply!!

It didn't, it was single brick, but it's had the insulation which is stuck on the outside of the house? Sorry, I'm not sure what it's called? It looks like polystyrene panels?
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Postby collectors » Mon Dec 05, 2016 4:41 pm

A Kick plinth heat would help. You can get them in electrical type or ones that can be attached to your central heating if you have heating pipes locally. Like the link below.

http://www.heatandplumb.com/acatalog/Sm ... oCCS7w_wcB
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