Wiring for gas oven and hob


Postby stickinsect » Sun Jan 16, 2011 4:40 pm

We're replacing a freestanding electric cooker with a gas oven and hob, both of which need an electrical supply. I'm planning to adapt the existing radial cooker circuit for this, but replacing the fuse with a lower rating (15A?) at the consumer unit.

The plan is:
1. To remove the existing control unit and reroute the cable to a switched fused connector unit (FCU) then run a spur to a flex outlet for the oven.
2. To run 2.5mm twin+earth cable from the first FCU to a second one, from which I'd run a spur to another flex outlet hob.
3. The flex outlets would be sited behind the cooker housing (hob will be set into worktop above oven) and the FCUs at the back of the cupboard next to the oven for easy access.

Does this wiring seem sensible and is there any advice on what fuse rating I should use at the consumer unit for this circuit?

Many thanks
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Postby ericmark » Sun Jan 16, 2011 10:08 pm

Although it seems easy and I am sure 90% of the time there would not be a problem you are assuming everything is A1. To assume is dangerous and you need to check the earth loop impedance etc.
You will need to apply to LABC and pay their fees as well as hire fees for test equipment and likely cheaper not to DIY.
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Postby stickinsect » Tue Jan 18, 2011 9:07 pm

Ericmark, thanks for your reply.

Is it the use of the cooker circuit that is your main concern?

The other option is to spur the FCUs from the kitchen ring mains. (The manufacturer recommends a fuse rating of 3A for each device) Would you consider that to be a safer option?

Regards

Stickinsect
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Postby ericmark » Wed Jan 19, 2011 8:10 am

There are many ways to utilise an old cooker supply to power other items in the kitchen in my parents house they have a mini consumer unit for kitchen.

With supplies less than 13A a grid switch arrangement with fuses may be better option if you can physically get the cables in the devices.

It is common to supply fused connection units from a cooker supply and hence use it for other items.

However my point is not what can or can't be done but the cost of DIY. I will assume since you are asking you intend to do it right and since it is in a kitchen that means the involvement of LABC to inspect your work under Part P regulations. And unless you provide them with paper work they can also charge for testing. So to DIY one is looking at between £100 and £200 charges from the LABC depending on area and for that sort of money likely you can get the job done for you. Hence not worth going down DIY route.

Even if you intend to do illegal work to be safe you still need to inspect and test what you have done. The meters required even if you have the knowledge to use them are not cheap. Even the plug in type with warning lamps cost £50 when earth loop impedance is included and a proper test set giving real readings is £75 just to hire. To buy around the £750.

If I was having a kitchen extension and LABC were already involved considering I already have meters then OK to DIY my electrics would be worth while. But unless just adding electrics to an existing building control or where one is disabled and you can get LABC for free then just not worth it.
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Postby stickinsect » Wed Jan 19, 2011 10:00 pm

Right, I understand your points. Thanks for putting it in context. Many thanks for your help.
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