wiring spot light


Postby sljx » Tue Dec 11, 2012 1:51 pm

Hi i would like to wire 6 spot lights in my kitchen. there is currently two feeds from a 2gang switch both one way. Want 3 spots on each switch.

I was thinking i could wire the feeds from switch into two seprate junction boxes then take 3 flexs from each JB to each spot light. would this work?
sljx
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Postby ericmark » Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:43 pm

Unlikely. In the main there is no neutral feed to UK switches so in the main you take feeds from the ceiling rose not the light switch.

With the use of mood lighting there was a move away from using the ceiling rose and switch back box was used instead but the threat of banning tungsten lighting has reduced this practice.

The quartz halogen lamp has some very serous problems as it can't be dimmed without seriously reducing lamp life and the 50 mm spots also rely on the light being reflected off white surfaces so unless the room is nearly all white they hardly light the room with typical 4 times the power being required to using standard bulbs and 25 times the power to equal the HF florescent fitting. And the rules as to distance from lights that combustible material must be kept means in many cases can't be fitted in the ceiling but have to stick out on pods. Upper floor floor board often too close.

I don't have spots in kitchen but I do use them. In the bedroom two stops either side of the bed work well to read with. As designed they give a narrow beam so one can read a book without lighting the whole room up.

To light a picture on the wall or a dark hole they are great but useless for general lighting. I have fitted them where customer insisted whole room looked like a planetarium. The larger units are not as bad the 10 inch circular lamps may be called spot lights but they in the main give out a large area of light per unit and using one every other two foot square in a suspended ceiling does seem to work well but again using the florescent tubes does work better. Again the 0.5 meter rule (422.3.1) means really only suitable with a suspended ceiling.

The fact it is a kitchen and therefore the LABC has to be notified means electricians are not willing in general to break the rules with kitchen lights. Years ago many spots were fitted by the fit it an run brigade who would leave no paper trail for anyone to later pull them up on. Today having to send the paperwork to scheme provider and LABC means even years later they could be held responsible for their actions. So any lights fitted have to have manufacturers recommendation to say they can be fitted in that position. Other wise 0.5 meter rule applies. The hoods do work in stopping other items getting too hot but often as a result the lamps themselves get too hot and failed lamp connectors is a common fault. Again unless the lamp states can be used with hood then take it they are not suitable. Those which can be used often have large chrome surrounds to remove the heat.

Today Cold Cathode and LED versions are available which clearly don't give out the same amount of heat but unless there is something to stop the lamp being replaced with a tungsten version you still can't fit them.

As to DIY likely cost more than using a scheme member electrician and you still have to convince the LABC the installation is safe. Last time I enquired local the LABC charge was £100 plus vat likely an electrician would do whole job for less than LABC inspection charge.
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Postby ericmark » Wed Dec 12, 2012 1:02 am

After posting I found a report on spot lights in ceilings.
[url]http://www.voltimum.co.uk/news/15881/consult.experts_hottopics.RegLegAndDir.Overview/building-regulations-part-b---avoiding-risk-of-fire-spread-through-recessed-lighting-in-dwellinghouses.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2012_12_10_VLT_VoltiTECH[/url]
I hope the sysop will allow the link as this is rather important.

As well as fire risk it also refers to:-
There is another important aspect that can have an effect on downlight choice and fitting. Until recently, recessed downlights were installed in homes and workplaces with little or no thought to heat losses, or the effect they might have to ceiling voids or loft spaces. However, the global focus on climate change, energy efficiency, CO2 emissions and high energy prices has resulted in a requirement that modern recessed downlights have to comply, not only with Part B, but also Part C for air flow, heat and moisture losses, and Part E for acoustics (the transmission of sound). Cutting holes in ceilings also creates compliance issues with these, and there may also be issues with National House Building Council (NHBC - www.nhbc.co.uk) requirements.

Personally this complying with Part B, C and E is just too much hassle I would just not use spot lights.
ericmark
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:49 pm
Location: Mold, North Wales.


Postby sljx » Wed Dec 12, 2012 8:39 am

Thanks for the information I won't be using tugsten. Being used in kitchen they will have to be ip65 rated.
There is a neutral in the feed..this may come from a ceiling rose I don't know only took the old light down haven't looked any further. If it does come from ceiling rose would my wiring plan work??
sljx
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 1:14 pm


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