Filling and disguising worktop joints

Summary: How to fill a mitred worktop joint

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Having fitted a kitchen worktop you may discover that the joints you have are not the tidiest bit of carpentry you have ever seen. Even using a worktop jig does not make the process easy for the DIY'er. It takes a very skilled carpenter to produce invisible joints and we always suggest working out exactly the length of worktop you need and, if you plan to fit it yourself, to order a little extra to practice joints on. Even if you order the cheapest possible worktop it is worth spending a day following our mitering a worktop project and wasting some timber to get it right.

There are proprietary adhesives made for joining work tops. These adhesives come in a range of colours which can be mixed and matched to suit the worktop colour you have.

Colour Match worktop joint

Colour Match worktop joint

Sometimes the joints are a little wider than one would hope and the adhesive does not quite fill the joint when the worktop sections are clamped together after cutting with a worktop jig. The adhesive can be mixed with some fine filler and the joint filled from the surface as you can see in the image. The filler will change the colour of the adhesive and make it slightly lighter so always mix a little and leave to dry for an hour or so before you assume the colour is correct.

Mix colours with filler

Mix colours with filler

Time spent on worktop joints can make or break the finish of a kitchen. Quite often the kitchen worktop itself is the focal point of the kitchen and it is certainly the most used area. Getting it right is not hard, but it does require patience and practice.

Neat joint

Neat joint

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