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Timber Joints 5: Including Shoulder and Rebate and Lapped Joints

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Summary: The shoulder or lapped joint is very common and is used for furniture and box constructions such as jewellery boxes. Find out how to make your own joints.

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For our entire timber joints section we are very grateful to www.technologystudent.com for allowing the use of their material. All images and text are  © V. Ryan  2002

Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint The joint to the left is a simple lapped joint. The shoulder can be seen clearly, this is usually planed using a rebate/shoulder plane or combination plane. This type of joint is often seen as a corner joint.

The jewellery box seen to the left has a base which sits inside a rebate or shoulder which has been planed / cut into each of the sides. The base has been pushed into the shoulder and this means it is level with the sides. Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint

HOW A REBATE JOINT IS MARKED OUT AND CUT


Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint A marking gauge is set to half the thickness of the material to be used for the lapped joint.

The marking gauge is used to produce a line across the end of a piece of wood and down the sides a little. This can be difficult to see, so a pencil can be used to highlight the gauged line. Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint


Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint A try square is then used to extend the line across the side of the wood. The marking out should look like the diagram below when completed. This shows the area of the joint to be cut away. It is good practice to shade the waste wood.


Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint DIY Book: Basic Carpentry DIY Book: Home Carpentry


One of the saw cuts can be made using a tenon saw and a bench hook. Normally the wood is clamped down so that it is less likely to move during sawing. Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint

Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint A marking gauge is set to half the thickness of the material to be used for the lapped joint.

If working in the same direction as the grain of the wood, a shoulder plane can then be used to finish the joint accurately. Scrap wood is clamped down on top of the joint and it is used to guide the plane. Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint


Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint If working across the grain of the wood, a chisel is used to straighten / clean up the joint. The wood should be G-clamped to the bench with scrap wood placed underneath. This ensures that the chisel is less likely to slip. If the chisel does slip then it will not damage the bench as it will hit the scrap wood. If a second side of the joint is prepared in exactly the same way, the two should form an accurate lapped joint. This joint can also be cut with a router but a little more practice is required.


Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped joint DIY Book: Basic Carpentry DIY Book: Home Carpentry

NEED MORE INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBER JOINTS?

Then visit our other four timber joint projects:

Timber Joints 1 - Halved Joints
Timber Joints 2 - The Tenon
Timber Joints 3 - Dovetail Joints
Timber Joints 4 - Finger Or Comb Joint
Timber Joints 5 - Shoulder / Rebate / Lapped Joint


Don't fancy doing this project yourself? We work with Checkatrade to ensure that we recommend only reliable and trustworthy tradesmen.

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