Advise on combination boiler install needed


Postby deguerre » Wed Jun 03, 2009 9:47 pm

Hi,
I wondered if someone would mind giving me some advise on having a combination boiler installed. I am far too trusting of people for my own good so I think it would be best for me to get some impartial advise and knowledge from a place like this, before I get any quotes done. That way I am less likely to get ripped off by a sharp salesman taking me for the mug I am!

The situation is as follows:
I have a flat that I rent out, I've have had no end of problems with the current system, mainly due to sludge I'm told. My tenant moves out soon so I'd like to have the whole lot torn out & a new system put in, new boiler, pipes, radiators the lot.

I want a boiler that is of good quality and is reliable. I'd rather pay more now for something decent that works than be paying out hand over fist in the future for something thats not up to the job. I'd also like one that plumbers are happy to work on if it does go wrong - my friend had a fairly new Ideal boiler, the first 2 people he called to look at it said they wouldn't touch it, I don't want that to happen!

I like the idea of having a combination boiler installed as it will free up some cupboard space. The flat is one bedroom, it has 3 radiators and 1 towel rail. Currently it has a boiler and hot water tank installed on very small pipes. There is a bath, so I'd like the boiler to have strong enough flow to fill it easily. Also the current shower is a New Team 1000 will this be compatible or do i need a new one?

Any advise on this matter would be greatly appreciated, thank you very much, Will
deguerre
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Postby htg engineer » Sat Jun 06, 2009 9:55 pm

Vaillant are very good boilers, there are other cheaper makes I'd recommend like Baxi or Potterton if you're on a tight budget, they're easy to work on so tends to keep labour costs down and spare parts are cheap.

For the size of the property a combi is probably the best bet.

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Postby deguerre » Sun Jun 07, 2009 9:16 am

Ok thanks, any advise on the shower?
deguerre
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Postby htg engineer » Sun Jun 07, 2009 2:25 pm

What type of shower is it ? if it's electric - it wont be affected.

If it's a mixer shower then with a combi it should be a thermostatic shower that will work off mains pressure hot and cold.


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Postby DIYRob » Thu Jun 11, 2009 9:13 pm

You shouldn't have to change all the pipework. When the new one is fitted the installer should do a power flush which clean's out all your sludge. Simply by not changing the pipes you'll save a bit of money, which you can throw the saving on the boiler.

I too reccomend the Vaillant. Have one myself, they're bulletproof.

I'll be Gas Safe qualified in about a year and a bit, and I'll be fitting only Valliants
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Postby htg engineer » Fri Jun 12, 2009 1:47 pm

'You shouldn't have to change all the pipework. When the new one is fitted the installer should do a power flush which clean's out all your sludge'

DIYRob - deguerre hasn't stated the pipe sizes.

If it's 8mm or 10mm I wouldn't even think about trying to powerflush - waste of time and money.

15mm yes a powerflush will work but if they're old pipes on an old boiler I would renew. Once you change to a pressurised system if there's any corrosion you'll get leaks - if not noticeable striaght away - you'll get sick of topping up the system pressure.

New boiler, radiator and rad valves - you'd might as well do it right, replace the pipeowkr and remember to flush and add inhibitor.

htg
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