Boiler Wiring


Postby triggerfish » Sun Mar 09, 2008 7:59 pm

Hello,

I've got a couple of questions about boiler wiring.

It's all wired up and works, but I have a couple of concerns:

1) The cable connecting it to the mains is 2.5mm wtin core and earth and connected to a 32A fuse in the consumer unit. I imagine the boiler (it's gas) doesn't really need that much power...should it be connected to a 16A fuse (and maybe with 1.5mm cable) ?

2) The FCU for the boiler is within the bathroom. Does this need to be moved and if so, are there any regulations regarding its height (it'd be in the kitchen, which is next to the bathroom)?

Thanks a lot for your help,

Mike
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Postby Skids » Sun Mar 09, 2008 11:30 pm

The only regulations you need to be worried about are ‘Building Regulations 2000, part P’ which generally makes it an ‘offence’, if you have not got a ‘ticket’, to connect a new circuit into the consumer unit, and,

The Gas Safety Regulations, which also require installers to be competent in gas work and to hold valid certificates (ticket), this generally means you are CORGI registered.

If you don’t know which wire to use or where the FCU goes, don’t worry put it where it looks nice.

However, before you fire it up, check your insurance cover and ask the neighbour’s to move out for a while, and when you come to sell the house someone will ask to see the installation and testing certificates!

If I have missed a trick here, sorry for being blunt, just go careful.

It’s just a thought; have a look what the manufactures instructions say?
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Postby ericmark » Mon Mar 10, 2008 10:12 am

5 amp is enough for a boiler but since you have a fused connection unit that should have fused it down. The supply to a 2.5mm cable is normally limited to 25 amp but there are different types of 2.5mm so could be OK with 32 although unlikely.
Regulations in bathrooms have changed and it may be OK. Use common sense is it likely to get wet and can you reach it while standing in the bath if either is true it needs moving or protecting a simple box over it so you need a tool, key or password to access it would most likely make it comply. But don't drill through cables when fitting box or any pipes.
If it was my house I would want it through an earth leakage trip just to be on safe side.
No need to down grade cable leave it as 2.5mm
Work in a bathroom other than straight replacement comes under Part P so DIY is really speaking out. In theory you can still do it but in practice you will never be able to satisfy building controls as to your skill level so if you think it is dangerous get a Part P electrician to look at it.
At the moment there are two sets of regulations in force the old set finishes on July1st I would get it looked at before then or it could become more expensive.
ericmark

Postby triggerfish » Mon Mar 10, 2008 8:10 pm

Thank you both for your quick replies. They were very useful. :)

I'm not actually going to start getting down into the dodgy parts of boiler installation. I've bought a house without any electrical certificates (or gas certificates, or any boiler instructions, unfortunately!) and I want to make it as safe as possible and do as much of the work myself before I get an electrician to come in and finish the job and check that it's all Part P compliant. I'll also get the boiler checked over by a CORGI registered plumber.

I've got the bathroom ceiling void open at the moment to move the switch from a rocker to a pull switch, so thought now would be the ideal time to move the FCU if needed, but it sounds like it's ok as it's pretty far from any water source (it's in zone 3, which I understand will be redundant soon).

I also didn't want the boiler to be attached to the wrong fuse, and although I'm sure the electrician will catch it when he/she comes in, I wanted to make it as safe as possible in the mean time. I'd only be switching it from one fuse to another at the consumer unit, and not touching the boiler itself. Do you recommend I leave it as it is until the electrician comes then? The FCU also has a socket connected to it, which I don't feel comfortable with in the bathroom, so if I switched to a lower amp fuse, I'd also get rid of the socket at the same time.

Thanks again for your help,

Mike
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Postby ericmark » Tue Mar 11, 2008 9:30 am

Under the new regulations socket-outlets are prohibited within a distance of 3 meters horizontally from the boundary of zone 1. 701.512.3 And everything needs an RCD including lights. 701.411.3.3 remember all or nothing as to change to new regulations. Old regs no sockets allowed. Part P required installation cert for anything new. this can't be signed by anyone who was not in control of the installation so anyone checking later can only sign an inspection and test not an installation cert. Of course I must recommend you use an electrician for any work in a bathroom as I have no way of knowing your skill. With regulations in process of changing you may need a new consumer unit as you say fuse and most with fuses will not allow RCD's to be fitted. If you do need it changing make sure it is to new regs not old ones for new regs most consumer units have three neutral bars not two as fitted to old regs consumer units. cut off date 1st July.
ericmark

Postby triggerfish » Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:44 am

Thanks again for your help. I'm definitely going to get someone in to change the consumer unit as well, so that's very useful advice. Cheers, Mike
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