Connecting LED Lights of Different Colors and Voltages?


Postby ivanzuelox » Wed Apr 06, 2016 7:53 pm

Hi guys, I want to assemble a panel of lights of different colors for the lighting of my living room

The only thing I know of electricity is that: there are different cables for different resistors for different
voltages according to use.

I have the idea of order of LED lights in a square aluminum board, but more than that I do not know. Also I
want to connect the maximum number of LED lights possible without overloading the three drivers.

I currently have 3 types of LED lights: white, red and blue. The technical detail of these is as follows:

List of my leds with electrical technical details:
- 50 (quantity) x 3w (watts) cold white / 3.2­3.8v 700ma
- 50 x 3w red / 2.2­2.4v 750ma
- 50 x 3w blue 445­455nm / 3.6­3.8v 700ma

Also I have:
- 150 x pcb stars of aluminum
- 3 x 50 watts drivers INPUT AC: 85/265v50/60hz AC: 0.8A OUTPUT DC: 24­38V DC: 1.5a+­5%
10C*5&*1W

I hope someone will agree to help me.
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Postby ericmark » Wed Apr 06, 2016 11:39 pm

So LED's are 700 and 750 mA and the driver is 800 mA can you spot the problem?

The mA output of the driver needs to be same or less than that of the LED's the current is the main thing.

As to volts well it states 24­38V DC Now I would guess it really says 24 ~ 38 Volt DC as to LED's 2.2­2.4v seems odd why two decimal points 2.22 ~ 2.24 volt seems reasonable. So it would seem 11 to 17 LED's per driver using red.

With blue 7 to 10 LED's per driver.

But until you get LED's to match the driver it is really a non starter.

The LED is a current device, yes it has a threshold voltage which gives you an idea as to the range of voltage required from the driver but current is the main thing. Some drivers have a massive range of voltages others are more limited. Using a LED as an indicator often the driver was a simple resistor.

Some LED's are sold as sets of three LED's and a resistor able to run off 12 vdc but rather uneconomic as much of the energy goes to heat the resistor. Some come as a package with a pulse width modulated controller and other like it would seem you have leave the user to provide the current control.

As with aircraft ground lights putting LED's in series with a current regulator means every LED has the same output no real worry about volt drop.

As to mixing blue and red in theroy if mA required is the same it should work. But there is something wrong for example the red 0.750 x 2.22 = 1.665 Watt so where does the 3 Watt come from? Nothing seems to match up!
ericmark
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Postby ivanzuelox » Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:42 pm

I'll just try will connect every two horizontal rows to a controller, I might add aluminum heat sinks and fans and measure the operating temperature, according to this, I'll see the option to add resistors.

Do you think this is feasible or work?
ivanzuelox
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Postby ivanzuelox » Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:43 pm

ericmark wrote:So LED's are 700 and 750 mA and the driver is 800 mA can you spot the problem?

The mA output of the driver needs to be same or less than that of the LED's the current is the main thing.

As to volts well it states 24­38V DC Now I would guess it really says 24 ~ 38 Volt DC as to LED's 2.2­2.4v seems odd why two decimal points 2.22 ~ 2.24 volt seems reasonable. So it would seem 11 to 17 LED's per driver using red.

With blue 7 to 10 LED's per driver.

But until you get LED's to match the driver it is really a non starter.

The LED is a current device, yes it has a threshold voltage which gives you an idea as to the range of voltage required from the driver but current is the main thing. Some drivers have a massive range of voltages others are more limited. Using a LED as an indicator often the driver was a simple resistor.

Some LED's are sold as sets of three LED's and a resistor able to run off 12 vdc but rather uneconomic as much of the energy goes to heat the resistor. Some come as a package with a pulse width modulated controller and other like it would seem you have leave the user to provide the current control.

As with aircraft ground lights putting LED's in series with a current regulator means every LED has the same output no real worry about volt drop.

As to mixing blue and red in theroy if mA required is the same it should work. But there is something wrong for example the red 0.750 x 2.22 = 1.665 Watt so where does the 3 Watt come from? Nothing seems to match up!


I'll just try will connect every two horizontal rows to a controller, I might add aluminum heat sinks and fans and measure the operating temperature, according to this, I'll see the option to add resistors.

Do you think this is feasible or work?
ivanzuelox
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
50%
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2016 7:43 pm

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